Let’s start with the obvious: We are experiencing the worst labor market since the Great Depression, if not ever. Since the COVID-19 crisis began, the employment-to-population ratio has cratered to a record low 51.3 percent, with nearly 43 million Americans unemployed or underemployed in April. That figure is likely to worsen in May, as about

Labor market monopsony exists when firms can wield outsized power to offer lower wages. Though antitrust enforcement can address monopsony, it isn’t enough; more robust labor regulations and protections are necessary, especially in markets characterized by low concentration and little use of anticompetitive practices. In Antitrust-Plus: Evaluating Additional Policies to Tackle Labor Monopsony, Roosevelt Fellow

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 9, 2020 Progressive Group Leaders to Congress: Major Federal Intervention Needed to Meet Scale of Crisis; Congress Must Put People Ahead of Corporations to Save Economy Washington, DC – Today, leaders of progressive research, policy, and advocacy groups released the following statement calling on Congress to move quickly to pass a robust

With the CARES Act corporate bailout underway, large corporations are once again being rescued by a hurting American public. No one doubts that stabilizing the economy and saving jobs as a first priority is absolutely critical. What’s also necessary is to understand what factors—besides the coronavirus—made large corporations so vulnerable in this moment.  One factor

Janelle Jones, the managing director of policy and research at Groundwork Collaborative, has coined what she calls a personal motto and economic ideology: “Black women best.” She means that if Black women—who, since our nation’s founding, have been the most disadvantaged by the rules that structure our society—can one day thrive in the economy, then

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:March 31, 2020 CONTACT:Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org High Profits, Low Wages, and Discrimination: Corporate America and the Double Wage Gap A Roosevelt report explores how US corporations make billions in profit from the gender and racial wage gaps, even before the coronavirus New York, NY—Since the 1980s, American corporations have seen their profits skyrocket,

Over the last several decades, a rise in worker productivity and flat wages have driven record-high corporate profits in the US. As the private, for-profit sector benefited, economic insecurity has increased and wage gaps persist. This is especially true for Black women, who face both the gender wage gap and the racial wage gap—a reinforcing

As millions face unemployment and dire financial prospects amid the coronavirus pandemic, hotels, airlines, and other large corporations are repeating the script of 2008: asking for massive public bailouts after years of extractive shareholder payments. Before the government buoys these companies with the public’s money, we must ensure that they are resilient in the future

Following a year-long congressional investigation into Wells Fargo’s egregious consumer abuses, lax corporate management, and toxic corporate culture, CEO Charles Scharf and Well Fargo’s board members will testify before the House Financial Service Committee this week. This hearing comes in the wake of a detailed report, written by the Financial Services Committee staff, exposing the

In The Contribution of Shareholder Primacy to the Racial Wealth Gap, Roosevelt Fellow Lenore Palladino explores several ways of evaluating the impact of disparate equity ownership, and payments to shareholders, on racial wealth disparities. Using data from the Federal Reserve’s Distributional Financial Accounts and S&P Compustat, Palladino measures corporate equity ownership by race and ethnicity