The rules of trade and of the global economy are failing too many. Due to false assumptions about the role of markets and the role of government in our economy, policymakers have narrowed their idea of international trade over the last 40 years, harming workers and hindering economic potential. By expanding our understanding of markets

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 11, 2019 CONTACT: Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org Rising Number of Hospital Mergers and Closures in Rural America Hurting Women’s Health, Economic Well-Being Roosevelt Institute documents adverse effects of market power crisis An issue brief released today by the Roosevelt Institute finds that corporate consolidation within America’s rural hospital sector is harming both

Structural problems in the health care and hospital industries are specifically hurting women in rural America, both as patients and as workers. In a new Roosevelt issue brief, Andrea Flynn, Rakeen Mabud, and Emma Chessen explore some of the industry-wide shifts that have occurred in rural areas over the last several decades. They then describe the

The mainstream economic theory that guides corporations in the US only works if markets are perfectly efficient. This flawed theory has led to corporate decision-making that centers shareholders above all else, including other stakeholders (e.g., workers), long-term business growth, and economic health. This shareholder-first ideology is referred to as “shareholder primacy,” which does not reflect

In a working paper, Roosevelt Senior Economist and Policy Counsel Lenore Palladino investigates whether stock buybacks occur more frequently, independent of other factors, when corporate insiders are selling their own personal shareholdings. In her empirical analysis of the relationship between insider sales and stock buybacks, Palladino finds that a 10 percent increase in insider sales

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 19, 2019 CONTACT: Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org The High Cost of Shareholder Power in Big Pharma New Roosevelt brief illustrates the magnitude of Big Pharma spending on shareholders NEW YORK, NY – At a time when Americans pay record prices for medications, pharmaceutical companies generate record profits devoted largely to rewarding shareholders

Despite Big Pharma’s claim that high-cost medicines are the price society must pay for innovation, recent research provides ample evidence that overpriced medicines are not necessary for the industry to find cures or revolutionize. Rather, high-cost and low-quality medicines are the price patients pay for an industry that prioritizes profit-seeking over public health. Like all

Tomorrow at Walmart’s shareholders’ meeting in Bentonville, Arkansas, Walmart workers will call out America’s broken corporate governance system and propose that Walmart workers be included on its board of directors. Walmart associate Cat Davis will be joined by Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT), who will speak on behalf of workers’ right to participate in corporate decision-making.

In “The Cost of Capture: How the Pharmaceutical Industry Has Corrupted Policymakers and Harmed Patients,” Roosevelt Fellow Julie Margetta Morgan and Advocacy Associate Devin Duffy explore how drug companies influence policymakers and what this means for patients, the American health care system, and our economy. One of a series on Big Pharma, this issue brief

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 22, 2019 CONTACT: Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org Capturing the Government: Big Pharma’s Take Over of Policymaking New brief explores how drug companies influence policymakers and the resulting harm in patient outcomes Today, the Roosevelt Institute released the issue brief, “The Cost of Capture: How the Pharmaceutical Industry has Corrupted Policy Makers and