The Financialization of Higher Education at Michigan State University is the latest report from Roosevelt’s Financialization of Higher Education project. To learn more about the project, click here. The US’s higher educational institutions today are a far cry from the promise progressives have envisioned for higher education. Successful public higher educational institutions have, rightly so, been defined

Finance is no longer channeling our collective investments to productive uses. Instead, it’s using society’s resources to enrich itself at the cost of students, taxpayers, and communities. The story of finance in the economy is an old and simple one- the finance sector grows and protects the savings of individuals and institutions, and pools them

New Report Outlines Higher Education’s $2.7 Billion ‘Debt Bomb’ in TIME: But it also has a real human cost – schools that are indebted and struggling to meet interest payments pass on those costs to students, which is one key reason that average per student debt has risen from $29,400 to $35,000 over the last

Higher education in the U.S. is in a state of crisis. We see evidence of this crisis in huge cuts in funding for public schools, skyrocketing costs of attendance at both private and public schools, and increases in student debt burdens. Financialization has a number of disturbing consequences for higher education, including increases in overall

In the last two decades, Wall Street banks have lured seven of the eight largest universities in Michigan into complex and risky financial deals. Through these deals, each school continues to pay millions to banks in fees while students throughout the state watch their tuition bills rise. City workers have suffered the effects of predatory