FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 18, 2018 CONTACT: Alexander Tucciarone, atucciarone@rooseveltinstitute.org, 516-263-9775   NEW ROOSEVELT NETWORK REPORT: MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY OFFICIALS ENGAGING IN EGREGIOUS FINANCIAL MISMANAGEMENT Student-Led Report Examines Financial Misjudgments and Points to Outsized Role of Financial Actors at Universities, in Broader Economy   EAST LANSING, MI – The Roosevelt Network today released a new

The Financialization of Higher Education at Michigan State University is the latest report from Roosevelt’s Financialization of Higher Education project. To learn more about the project, click here. America’s higher educational institutions today are a far cry from the promise progressives have envisioned for higher education. Successful public higher educational institutions have, rightly so, been defined as

Larry Fink’s annual letter to CEOs is making waves for its pronouncement that “companies must benefit all of their stakeholders, including shareholders, employees, customers, and the communities in which they operate.” Fink is the head of $6.3 trillion dollar asset manager BlackRock and the leader of a rising chorus calling on companies to stop focusing

Why This Matters is a series from Roosevelt staff connecting our individual work—from papers to reports and everything in between—to our broader vision of creating a better, more equitable economic and political system. This series will give readers the top takeaways from our latest writing and thinking, with a focus on why they matter as we

The ability of workers to bargain for a greater share of a firm’s corporate profits has eroded over decades, and one of the growing drivers of this reality is the financialization of the corporate sector. Corporate financialization can be summed up as two behaviors: firms (like Walmart or Pfizer) increasingly earning profits from financial activity

Despite energetic conversations around stagnant wages and job creation, few consider that the financialization of America’s public corporations has contributed just as much to economic inequality as more commonly-cited factors. The debate seems well-settled: scholars point to globalization[1], skill-biased technical change[2], and the decline of union density[3]. Others point to the “rise of the robots”[4],

“Higher education” is a vague term. It describes a sector that is hardly uniform, with over 4,000 degree-granting institutions eligible for federal funding but serious disparities among them. A college education from one of these institutions continues to serve as a prerequisite to moving up the income ladder in our narrative about economic mobility. Yet,

New Report Outlines Higher Education’s $2.7 Billion ‘Debt Bomb’ in TIME: But it also has a real human cost – schools that are indebted and struggling to meet interest payments pass on those costs to students, which is one key reason that average per student debt has risen from $29,400 to $35,000 over the last

Education is the cornerstone of the American dream: Study hard, earn a degree, and your work will be rewarded. Lee Hall, a university professor who holds two law degrees, is still waiting for his rewards. Teaching five undergraduate and law school courses per semester, Hall makes an annual salary of $15,000—less than a pet-sitter, he

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Over the past month, college students across the county have explored how financialization affects their schools with a series of trainings led by Refund America, Hedge Clippers, LittleSis, and the Roosevelt Institute. As many students know, Wall Street firms make billions of dollars off of higher education every year through vehicles including toxic swaps and exorbitant

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