Ten years after the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the cost of health care continues to rise faster than wages, and millions of Americans are uninsured or underinsured—a toxic combination during a global pandemic.  While further action on the Hill has stalled, several state legislatures have sought to go beyond the ACA by

In striking ways, the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has exposed the fragility of the US economy and the immense power disparities and systemic disadvantages built into our social contract. Tens of millions of people across entire sectors of our economy are out of work—and many were living paycheck to paycheck before this crisis hit. Right now, the Roosevelt Institute’s work

During the past month, our colleagues have been sharing their analyses of the effects of COVID-19 on the economy. They’ve underscored the continued gender imbalance of labor, the racial injustice central to our economy, and the disparate impact the virus has had on different groups of our country, and they’ve provided key analysis of the

In response to the growing coronavirus crisis, states are stopping “nonessential” surgeries to ease the burden on hospitals and medical workers. While this is admirable in theory, conservatives at both the state and federal levels have capitalized on these legitimate efforts to protect our collective well-being by misclassifying critical care as “nonessential” and restricting the

The coronavirus crisis is, first and foremost, a health crisis. The Trump administration’s failure to take the threat of COVID-19 seriously—and our systematic, decades-long decimation of our nation’s public health infrastructure—has turned what may have been a public health challenge into a crisis for our health care system. And one area where the failures of

The current economic crisis is fast-moving, and many of the challenges we are facing—and anticipating—are unprecedented. Though the immediate effects of the coronavirus may spark a potential recession, our economy’s underlying structural problems mean that the fallout will likely be much worse and last longer for millions of people unless we act quickly and aggressively. 

The recent bill introduced by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell tries to stem the current economic crisis. In a previous document, “A Forward-Thinking Response to the Coronavirus Recession,” we outlined five elements that any response needs to include: (1) Help people directly by providing cash, (2) support workers, (3) help states and municipalities, (4) prevent

COVID-19 represents both a public health emergency and an economic crisis. While federal, state, and local governments must take strong steps to stem the spread of the virus — from continuing to close schools, restaurants, and workplaces and limit the size of gatherings, to ensuring that everyone has access to health care and can be

The coronavirus outbreak has led to a collapsing economy. The economic situation is deteriorating so fast that people are struggling in real time to understand fundamental questions and policy objectives.  “A Forward-Thinking Policy Response to the Coronavirus Recession” is an overview of where things stand. We focus on the nature of the economic crisis, and

March is Women’s History Month, and this year’s celebration starts with June Medical Services v. Gee, a current Supreme Court case that poses the latest threat both to Roe v. Wade specifically and to women’s health and economic security at large. This case is the most recent reminder of how precarious reproductive health and rights