Janelle Jones, the managing director of policy and research at Groundwork Collaborative, has coined what she calls a personal motto and economic ideology: “Black women best.” She means that if Black women—who, since our nation’s founding, have been the most disadvantaged by the rules that structure our society—can one day thrive in the economy, then

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:March 31, 2019 CONTACT:Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org High Profits, Low Wages, and Discrimination: Corporate America and the Double Wage Gap A Roosevelt report explores how US corporations make billions in profit from the gender and racial wage gaps, even before the coronavirus New York, NY—Since the 1980s, American corporations have seen their profits skyrocket,

Over the last several decades, a rise in worker productivity and flat wages have driven record-high corporate profits in the US. As the private, for-profit sector benefited, economic insecurity has increased and wage gaps persist. This is especially true for Black women, who face both the gender wage gap and the racial wage gap—a reinforcing

The reparations debate is longstanding and deep-rooted. In our forthcoming book, From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the 21st Century (University of North Carolina Press, April 2020), we advance the following general definition of reparations: “a program of acknowledgement, redress, and closure for a grievous injustice.” Acknowledgement is the admission of wrong

In The Contribution of Shareholder Primacy to the Racial Wealth Gap, Roosevelt Fellow Lenore Palladino explores several ways of evaluating the impact of disparate equity ownership, and payments to shareholders, on racial wealth disparities. Using data from the Federal Reserve’s Distributional Financial Accounts and S&P Compustat, Palladino measures corporate equity ownership by race and ethnicity

Inequality is a defining American issue, and perhaps no measure more accurately exemplifies the failures and injustices of historic and current-day economic decisions than the “racial wealth gap.” In the current political moment—when bold ideas to rebalance economic and political power, especially by race, are central to public debate—we have the opportunity to reevaluate how

The US economy has been structured by rules that either privilege or exploit people based on their race. Our nation’s legacy of implicit and explicit racial exclusions continue to have a deep impact on who is able to meaningfully participate and profit in the current American economy and who is left behind. The racialized policy

The $1.6 trillion student debt crisis is holding back many Americans, but it is especially damaging to racial equality. Already disadvantaged by generational wealth disparities, Black students and their families end up paying more for college than white families do, and they get a lot less in the end. To build a higher education system

Earlier this month, in a powerful act of solidarity, 36 Jewish activists were arrested for obstructing access to an ICE detention facility. It’s a salient reminder that step one of being an ally is knowing your history. I think often of how inextricably linked Asian Amerian history is with that of other people of color

Marking the country’s independence, the Fourth of July is celebrated annually with fireworks, backyard barbecues, baseball games, and all things Americana. To many, Independence Day represents the ideals of this country–freedom, equity, and independence from tyranny. But not everyone was or is included in those ideals; in the period between 1776 and 1790, slaves comprised