Citing cost concerns, House Democrats amended their latest coronavirus response package yesterday to exclude a proposal that would have cancelled up to $10,000 in student debt for more than 45 million Americans. The new proposal offers cancellation only to a narrow group of “economically distressed” borrowers. This change is worrisome, not only because it leaves

My experience with the Roosevelt Institute is linked to the person I admire most in politics: Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA). When I entered my first year of college at UCLA, I aspired to attend law school one day; public policy was not on my professional radar, and I was pessimistic about politics in general. At

During the past month, our colleagues have been sharing their analyses of the effects of COVID-19 on the economy. They’ve underscored the continued gender imbalance of labor, the racial injustice central to our economy, and the disparate impact the virus has had on different groups of our country, and they’ve provided key analysis of the

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:March 23, 2020 CONTACT:Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org STATEMENT: Roosevelt Institute Responds to Student Debt Emergency Relief Act New York, NY—President Donald Trump announced on Friday that he will allow a two-month reprieve from paying student loans for the nation’s more than 42 million federal student loan borrowers during this national emergency.  Today, Rep. Ayanna

“I understood that my responsibility as a student activist wasn’t simply to call attention to what was wrong but to work diligently to make it right. And I have tried to live that life, every day” —Stacey Abrams On Saturday, January 11th, Stacey Abrams shared her hopeful wisdom with over 100 Roosevelt Network students, alumni,

The Great Democracy Initiative’s (GDI) latest report on how Dodd-Frank regulatory powers could be used to curb carbon financing offers an innovative approach to addressing the climate crisis. For the Roosevelt Network, it also reminds us that this wouldn’t be possible without the groundwork of youth-led divestiture movements that have increasingly gained momentum in recent

Against the backdrop of a $1.6 trillion student debt crisis and declining college enrollment, free college has emerged as a political lightning rod in today’s higher education debate. Questions about who should and will benefit⁠—and what “free” even means⁠—have created a free-for-whom free-for-all, with proposals varying both by student and institutional access. To evaluate these

College affordability has been a major kitchen-table issue for American families for the past three decades. This is not surprising considering that college tuition rates have shot up since the 1980s: Tuition at public four-year colleges increased 213 percent from 1987 to 2017 and 129 percent at private not-for-profit colleges, helping drive the $1.6 trillion

The idea of “free college” has assumed an important place in the world of big and bold new policy ideas. However, it’s become an umbrella phrase for a variety of different policy proposals with very different terms and conditions. A free college plan can reinforce progressive values—reducing racial disparities, supporting democracy, and building a more

As policymakers consider free or debt-free college plans, it is critical that they recognize that today higher education is essential and that the federal government can play a vital role in ensuring that quality higher education is broadly accessible. Many current free or debt-free college proposals share a similar structure of creating federal-state partnerships, but