Growing up as a Bengali American woman in Arizona, I have repeatedly been left with an unshakable feeling of being an outsider looking in. Belonging to the only Muslim family in my small community, I struggled to relate to my peers. I can recall being forced to navigate a variety of stereotypes and constantly fielding

In the current debate on the future of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy, the data shouldn’t matter. And I say this as a confirmed data geek: My job at the Roosevelt Institute is the fourth think tank job that I’ve had, and in grad school I had three semesters of econometrics. But

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“Being unable to vote is like being on the fringe of society [as] a citizen that doesn’t have an active participation in it. You are just there, observing. You have no opportunity to affect change.” – Ken Shutle The ability to participate in our political system, and in particular the power to cast a vote,

Human Rights

We are in a pivotal moment in our country’s continued struggle for justice and civil rights. As movements for immigrant, gender and racial justice continue to call on our institutions to contend with unfulfilled promises and unequitable treatment, we have the opportunity to position ourselves as a nation committed to living out a vision of true

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Although research shows that diversity yields positive performance and returns in capital markets, minorities remain underrepresented in this industry. A new joint report from The ReFund America Project, Roosevelt Institute and Service Employees International Union finds opportunities for investment consultants to both promote minority asset managers and create long-term financial value for institutional investors. The

Rewrite the Racial Rules: Building an Inclusive American Economy argues that, in order to understand racial and economic inequality among black Americans, we must acknowledge the racial rules that undergird our economy and society. Those rules—laws, policies, institutions, regulations, and normative practices—are the driving force behind the patently unequal life chances and opportunities for too many individuals. In

Emerging Fellow for Equal Justice Andrew Lindsay writes in the New York Times on Amherst Uprising and the fight for racial justice on his campus: For many students of color, at Amherst College and elsewhere, it is not uncommon to feel a continuous sense of homelessness. “Are you sure this space is really mine?” we

THE PROBLEM Historically, colleges and universities have played a passive role in the prevention and education directly relating to sexual assault and rape on their campuses. Common statistics are all too real for far too many students embarking on a path towards higher education. One in five women in college will be sexually assaulted at

In the wake of the Umpqua college shooting, Emerging Fellow for Equal Justice Andrew Lindsay issued the following statement on behalf of Roosevelt: Full text: “In the wake of yet another shooting on a college campus, our thoughts lie with the friends, family, and community of the latest victims of the epidemic of gun violence in

Roosevelt @ In Action: Tulane

At Tulane, Roosevelter Courtney Liss is working on her campus to support the Campus Accountability and Safety Act currently being debated in the US Senate. Courtney raised money on her campus to create an awareness campaign, including a week of window paintings, a substantial letter writing campaign and several meetings with campus groups and administration