For too long, the building blocks of a good life, including solid benefits, strong wages, and safe working conditions, have been left to the whim of markets and employers rather than guaranteed for all. In today’s economy, curbing corporate and employer power and reclaiming public power are essential steps toward addressing the collective changes that

Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) and Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal (D-CA) introduced the Domestic Workers Bill of Rights today, backed by the National Domestic Workers Alliance. The bill would provide essential workplace rights and protections to a group of workers who have long been left out of basic standards for safety, security, pay, and well-being—in part because

Earlier this month, in a powerful act of solidarity, 36 Jewish activists were arrested for obstructing access to an ICE detention facility. It’s a salient reminder that step one of being an ally is knowing your history. I think often of how inextricably linked Asian Amerian history is with that of other people of color

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 11, 2019 CONTACT: Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org Rising Number of Hospital Mergers and Closures in Rural America Hurting Women’s Health, Economic Well-Being Roosevelt Institute documents adverse effects of market power crisis An issue brief released today by the Roosevelt Institute finds that corporate consolidation within America’s rural hospital sector is harming both

Structural problems in the health care and hospital industries are specifically hurting women in rural America, both as patients and as workers. In a new Roosevelt issue brief, Andrea Flynn, Rakeen Mabud, and Emma Chessen explore some of the industry-wide shifts that have occurred in rural areas over the last several decades. They then describe the

The mainstream economic theory that guides corporations in the US only works if markets are perfectly efficient. This flawed theory has led to corporate decision-making that centers shareholders above all else, including other stakeholders (e.g., workers), long-term business growth, and economic health. This shareholder-first ideology is referred to as “shareholder primacy,” which does not reflect

In partnership with the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, the Roosevelt Institute evaluated two decades of the Ford Foundation’s grant-making that centers the racial wealth gap (RWG) and provided recommendations for how the philanthropic sector can more effectively address the issue. Roosevelt Fellows Andrea Flynn and Rakeen Mabud find that Ford’s work

In a working paper, Roosevelt Senior Economist and Policy Counsel Lenore Palladino investigates whether stock buybacks occur more frequently, independent of other factors, when corporate insiders are selling their own personal shareholdings. In her empirical analysis of the relationship between insider sales and stock buybacks, Palladino finds that a 10 percent increase in insider sales

Growing up as a Bengali American woman in Arizona, I have repeatedly been left with an unshakable feeling of being an outsider looking in. Belonging to the only Muslim family in my small community, I struggled to relate to my peers. I can recall being forced to navigate a variety of stereotypes and constantly fielding

How to Win Our Votes in 2020

By the end of tonight—day two of the first round of the Democratic presidential primary debates—there will be various takes, including who has a better plan to fix health care, who prioritizes the climate crisis, and who’s the most likeable. Here at the Roosevelt Institute, we’re judging the candidates on one essential criterion: How are