In the past two decades, equal opportunities for people with disabilities (PWDs) have been outlined and guaranteed through two federal acts: the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act and the 2014 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. Intended to increase access to high-quality workforce services and preparation for competitive integrated employment, these federal acts set precedent for

By mid-May, COVID-19 had killed more Americans than the Vietnam War, Gulf War, Afghanistan War, and Iraq War combined. The magnitude of this pandemic—and its disproportionately deadly assault on Black communities—is astounding. In Mississippi, Black Americans account for 38 percent of the population and 66 percent of COVID-19 related deaths. In Michigan, those figures are

Ten years after the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the cost of health care continues to rise faster than wages, and millions of Americans are uninsured or underinsured—a toxic combination during a global pandemic.  While further action on the Hill has stalled, several state legislatures have sought to go beyond the ACA by

Person looking into unemployment office window

The Department of Labor (DOL) was slated to release the latest data on unemployment filings tomorrow (the announcement is delayed until May 8), figures that will provide a staggering picture of COVID-19’s devastating effects on workers and our economy. Though not unexpected, these findings must shape the strategy, size, and scope for America’s economic recovery. 

The COVID-19 pandemic poses deep and intertwined structural threats to an American economy that was already fragile. When the virus struck, the US had far greater wealth and income inequality than other advanced nations, and far larger coverage gaps in health and social insurance—from paid leave to unemployment insurance. As always, those inequalities were starker

Tagged under: ,

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:April 30, 2020 CONTACT:Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org American Labor Law Is Broken; Worker Survey Data Tells Us How it Fails and How to Fix ItNew Roosevelt report outlines new criteria for workplace law reform New York, NY—Worker power in the United States has long been in a downward spiral. Over the past five decades,

American labor and employment law is broken—affording workers little voice and few rights—and the COVID-19 pandemic has cast these failings in sharp relief. But even before the coronavirus crisis, a growing number of labor activists, policymakers, and academics have been calling for a fundamental overhaul of workplace law. In American Workers’ Experiences with Power, Information,

From the lack of paid sick leave to a shortage of hospital beds, the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed glaring problems in our social infrastructure. Those who remain on the job in essential industries risk exposure, and therefore their lives, every day. The threat posed to working people today is both an immediate crisis and also

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:April 24, 2020 CONTACT:Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org Worker Voice in the Time of COVID-19New report explores how and why front-line workers must be guaranteed a voice in the next stimulus bill New York, NY—Frontline workers’ strikes and protests have made clear that workers have been excluded from decision-making in response to the COVID-19 crisis.

The COVID-19 pandemic is exposing structural flaws in our economy that have made the crisis far worse than it should have been. Rampant inequality, disinvestment in public institutions, and a persistent erosion of worker protections have created a precarious economy that has collapsed under the immediate crisis. Congress has acted quickly, appropriating billions of dollars