This is an edited version of his talk delivered at “Does America Have a Monopoly Problem,” co-hosted by the Roosevelt Institute and the George Washington Institute of Public Policy on September 25, 2017, in Washington, DC. The Nobel Prize winner argues that an economy dominated by large corporations has failed the many and enriched the

Fighting Short-Termism With Worker Power asks, “Can Germany’s co-determination system fix American corporate governance?” Prioritizing immediate increases in share price and payouts at the expense of long-term business investment and growth—a behavior we refer to as short-termism—has driven the inequality crisis in America and weakened our economy. By comparing the German stakeholder system of co-determination

Welcome to the inaugural edition of Why This Matters, a new series from Roosevelt staff connecting our individual work—from papers to reports and everything in between—to our broader vision of creating a new, more equitable economic and political system. This series will give readers the top takeaways from our latest writing and thinking, with a focus on why

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High-speed internet has become essential to full participation in today’s economy and is increasingly considered the “fourth utility,” joining the more commonly recognized vital goods: water, electricity, and heat. From applying for jobs to doing homework, access to fast, reliable internet is crucial to making the most of opportunities in today’s world. Based on the

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The Hidden Rules of Race shines an objective light on the discriminatory systems and structures that perpetuate disparities between black and white Americans. The authors’ call for a comprehensive reorientation of our perspective on economic and racial inequality is bold, timely, and deeply necessary for those of us who wish to build a more inclusive

Our colleagues at the Roosevelt Institute, together with the Levy Institute, just published an exciting new paper entitled, “Modeling the Macroeconomic Effects of a Universal Basic Income.” The paper takes a major step forward in answering an important question: How would a massive federal spending program like a “universal basic income” (UBI) affect economic growth

A Real Monopoly Moment

The news that Barry Lynn’s Open Markets group has been evicted from its DC think tank home, New America, for crossing the interests of its major funder, Google, is a legitimately shocking development. This development crystalizes the concerns about monopoly power that we at Roosevelt have been pointing out these past few years—along with our

“Right now,” wrote Senator Chuck Schumer in a New York Times op-ed on Monday, “millions of unemployed or underemployed people, particularly those without a college degree, could be brought back into the labor force” with appropriate government policies. With this seemingly anodyne point, Schumer took sides in a debate that has sharply divided economists and policymakers: Is

Block granting is the process of redirecting federal funds to states, which then have sole control over how that money is allocated. States can lift federal restrictions on how the money should be spent. This policy choice can have deeply pernicious effects and often serves as a back door for slashing the budgets of social

It is apparent that not only are there high levels of inequalities within most countries, but those inequalities have been growing over time. They are much larger today than they were a third of a century ago. It is also clear that there is far from equal opportunity: the life prospects of children of rich and

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