I’m pleased to be able to kick off Roosevelt’s blog symposium on international tax rules, joined by Rasmus Corlin Christensen of Copenhagen Business School, Valpy Fitzgerald from Oxford, Jayati Ghosh from Jawaharlal Nehru University, and Martin Hearson from Sussex. Additional thanks to Tommaso Faccio of ICRICT for helping coordinate. We are anchoring our blog symposium

Today is Black Friday, the start of the holiday shopping season. Retail workers will leave their Thanksgivings early—if they enjoy one at all—to start long shifts for too little pay in order to support the consumer binging that is America’s holiday season. The deals for shoppers may be sweet, and the profits for companies will

The US economy has been structured by rules that either privilege or exploit people based on their race. Our nation’s legacy of implicit and explicit racial exclusions continue to have a deep impact on who is able to meaningfully participate and profit in the current American economy and who is left behind. The racialized policy

We’ve known about climate change for an entire generation, yet decades of research about the climate crisis and the threat it poses have largely fallen silent in Washington. Recently, this has begun to change. Led by youth activists and environmental justice groups, environmental politics are swiftly shifting. Rather than offering tweaks to the existing system,

For the first time in our history, the climate crisis and how to combat it is the issue dominating the presidential debate. Many Democratic candidates have released climate proposals that seek to reduce carbon emissions in order to align with recommendations made by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Progressives should applaud the collective

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:November 5, 2019 CONTACT:Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org How We Got Here: Economic Ideology and Climate Inaction New Roosevelt report explores how neoliberal ideology has stymied action to address the growing climate crisis New York, NY—Since President Ronald Reagan entered the White House with big promises to smash the regulatory state and free the market,

Today’s pharmaceutical industry is failing most Americans. Every day, a new story emerges about an outrageous price spike for a lifesaving drug, a fraud perpetrated on the American people in the name of profit, or the revolving door of administration officials entering an agency from a drug company or leaving to go to one—a practice

For decades, regulators have had only limited success in taming a for-profit college industry that routinely defrauds students, inflates prices, and produces devastatingly bad outcomes for student loan borrowers. But recently, instead of promoting complex regulatory schemes, some policymakers have offered a simple solution: take away for-profit colleges’ federal subsidies. Today, Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-WA)

Thank you, Chairwoman Maloney and Ranking Member Huizenga, for inviting me to speak today. It is an honor to be here. My name is Lenore Palladino, and I am Assistant Professor of Economics & Public Policy at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, a Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, and Research Associate at the Political Economy

Corporate profits and executive pay are sky high today, while wages for most American workers have remained low and stagnant over the past several decades. Today’s high-profit, low-wage economy is, in part, a result of rules and policies that shape corporate decision-making. These rules have allowed CEOs, shareholders, and executives to move more and more