Measured conventionally, very little about today’s politics makes sense. Many attempts to explain the chaos point to political partisanship or regional animosity, but we believe that the chaos is a sign of something deeper: the death of one worldview and the ascent of another. The neoliberal ideal—that markets would create both economic and political freedom

College affordability has been a major kitchen-table issue for American families for the past three decades. This is not surprising considering that college tuition rates have shot up since the 1980s: Tuition at public four-year colleges increased 213 percent from 1987 to 2017 and 129 percent at private not-for-profit colleges, helping drive the $1.6 trillion

The idea of “free college” has assumed an important place in the world of big and bold new policy ideas. However, it’s become an umbrella phrase for a variety of different policy proposals with very different terms and conditions. A free college plan can reinforce progressive values—reducing racial disparities, supporting democracy, and building a more

As policymakers consider free or debt-free college plans, it is critical that they recognize that today higher education is essential and that the federal government can play a vital role in ensuring that quality higher education is broadly accessible. Many current free or debt-free college proposals share a similar structure of creating federal-state partnerships, but

In response to “The Starving State: Why Capitalism’s Salvation Depends on Taxation” by Joseph E. Stiglitz, Gabriel Zucman, and Todd Tucker for Foreign Affairs, the Roosevelt Institute is hosting a blog symposium to further examine the history of international tax rules and the path ahead toward more inclusive and fair international tax policies. Opening the

The negotiations on corporate taxation at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) BEPS Inclusive Framework initiative have rightly generated much discussion, both on the process and on the proposed changes in tax policies. Allison Christians has pointed to several concerns that developing countries have with both: the proposal is one that has maximum

I’m pleased to be able to kick off Roosevelt’s blog symposium on international tax rules, joined by Rasmus Corlin Christensen of Copenhagen Business School, Valpy Fitzgerald from Oxford, Jayati Ghosh from Jawaharlal Nehru University, and Martin Hearson from Sussex. Additional thanks to Tommaso Faccio of ICRICT for helping coordinate. We are anchoring our blog symposium

Today is Black Friday, the start of the holiday shopping season. Retail workers will leave their Thanksgivings early—if they enjoy one at all—to start long shifts for too little pay in order to support the consumer binging that is America’s holiday season. The deals for shoppers may be sweet, and the profits for companies will

The US economy has been structured by rules that either privilege or exploit people based on their race. Our nation’s legacy of implicit and explicit racial exclusions continue to have a deep impact on who is able to meaningfully participate and profit in the current American economy and who is left behind. The racialized policy

We’ve known about climate change for an entire generation, yet decades of research about the climate crisis and the threat it poses have largely fallen silent in Washington. Recently, this has begun to change. Led by youth activists and environmental justice groups, environmental politics are swiftly shifting. Rather than offering tweaks to the existing system,