©Dano Wall

Without bold, visionary action to address race- and gender-based wealth inequities, the chasm between those who are economically secure and those who are not—mainly Black, brown, and Native American communities and women—will continue to grow. In the end, these issues threaten our nation’s ability to finally achieve our promise of freedom, dignity, and security for

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 19, 2019 CONTACT: Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org Toward a Just Economy: How a Universal Basic Income Can Curb Racial Inequality Coinciding with Juneteenth and the presidential debates, a new issue brief explores the role of guaranteed income in combating racial wealth inequalities NEW YORK, NY – A new issue brief released today

The greatest challenge of the 21st century—the climate crisis—is here: The global community has just 11 years to cut emissions by 45 percent and must achieve carbon neutrality by 2050 to prevent temperatures from rising more than 1.5oC, according to climate scientists. In Decarbonizing the US Economy: Pathways Toward a Green New Deal, Roosevelt Fellows Mark

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 14, 2019 CONTACT: Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org The Role of the Economy in Combating Climate Change New Roosevelt Institute report outlines an economic policy framework to address climate change while promoting growth and ensuring equitable economic outcomes NEW YORK, NY – The United States needs a new approach to climate change—one that

On Friday, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) released the unemployment figures for May. As expected, the reported unemployment rate was very low—3.6 percent, the same as last month. Combined with the steady growth in employment over the past few years, this level of unemployment—not seen since the 1960s—suggests an exceptionally strong labor market by historical

Tomorrow at Walmart’s shareholders’ meeting in Bentonville, Arkansas, Walmart workers will call out America’s broken corporate governance system and propose that Walmart workers be included on its board of directors. Walmart associate Cat Davis will be joined by Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT), who will speak on behalf of workers’ right to participate in corporate decision-making.

This week I’ve been lucky enough to have a number of fascinating reads fall into my lap/inbox/text message notifications. The first of which is “Funambulist, Issue No. 23: Insurgent Architecture.” The Funambulist is a bi-monthly publication that challenges its readers to address “spatial perspectives on political anticolonial, antiracist, queer, feminist and/or antiableist struggles in various

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In “The Cost of Capture: How the Pharmaceutical Industry Has Corrupted Policymakers and Harmed Patients,” Roosevelt Fellow Julie Margetta Morgan and Advocacy Associate Devin Duffy explore how drug companies influence policymakers and what this means for patients, the American health care system, and our economy. One of a series on Big Pharma, this issue brief

As of late, I’ve been doing my utmost to find the silver linings of an otherwise frightening, frustrating, and disappointing news cycle—a rather difficult task in this political moment. There’s the legal fight brewing over Roe v. Wade, and Emily Peck’s sobering piece in HuffPost on the economic peril faced by women—and especially women of

Economic inequality is on the rise. Corporate “shareholder primacy” means that the vast majority of today’s record corporate profits are used to increase the wealth of shareholders, through dividends and stock buybacks.[1] Meanwhile, real wages for non-executive workers have essentially remained stagnant for decades. Increasing worker bargaining power in the 21st century is necessary, and