FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 6, 2018 CONTACT: Alexander Tucciarone, atucciarone@rooseveltinstitute.org, 516-263-9775   ROOSEVELT INSTITUTE FELLOW, ANTHEM PRESS RELEASE NEW BOOK ON KEY GLOBAL ECONOMIC FLASH POINT IN TRUMP ERA Book Focuses on Controversial Legal Mechanism Used to Challenge Labor, Environmental, Consumer Protections Around the World   NEW YORK, NY– This week, Roosevelt Institute Fellow and

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The Overselling of Globalization

Globalization was oversold. Politicians and some economists wrongly argued for trade agreements on the basis of job creation. The gains to GDP or growth were overestimated, and the costs, including adverse distributional effects, were underestimated. There have been important political consequences of this overselling, including the undermining of confidence in the elites that advocated globalization.

Last week, the Trump administration launched an unprecedented action to enforce the environmental rules in a trade agreement between the United States and Peru. According to the press release: “United States Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer today directed the United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to block future timber imports from a Peruvian exporter based on

As negotiators meet in Arlington this week to discuss the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the Trump administration is again rattling nerves. While no formal proposal is publicly available, the U.S. Trade Representative is reportedly calling for stricter Buy America rules in government procurement, a five-year sunset clause (i.e. the agreement would not be renewed

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Boeing! Bombardier!! Bears!!!

From a casual look at today’s business headlines, you’d think the Commerce Department had declared war on the world. “The Commerce Department will slap stiff tariff on Bombardier’s new jet” “Bombardier hit with 219% duty on sale of jets to Delta Air Lines” “UK warns Boeing over Bombardier trade row” “Bombardier stock watchers bracing for

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Washington State workers got a Labor Day reprieve when the World Trade Organization sided with the U.S. over the state’s aircraft subsidies. But — after years of the U.S. trying to throw its weight around in the Geneva court — the result may be more mixed than it appears at first glance. What They Found Today’s decision reverses a

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On Monday, Congressional Democrats unveiled their Better Deal agenda to make “bold changes to our politics and our economy.” As my colleagues at Roosevelt have noted, the platform is strong on tackling anti-trust and monopoly power and on recognizing we are not yet back at true full employment. As the agenda acknowledges, there’s much left

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Last year, a World Bank tribunal waded into a long-running debate about how and when states can use a so-called prudential measures defense. While the decision (Rusoro Mining Limited v. Venezuela) was rendered in August 2016, I missed reading it at the time and have not seen any mention of this in the usual wonk

Late on Monday, the Trump administration released their long-awaited objectives for the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). If it looks familiar to trade wonks, that’s because it is. In area after area, the Trump administration proposes to change the North American pact to make it more like the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

On Independence Day, Two Ways International Law Tests Social Contracts In 1776, America declared economic and political independence from its colonial masters. Two-hundred and forty-one years later, American workers are still looking for economic enfranchisement in a world of global interdependence.  Two happenings in recent weeks illustrate how. CAFTA’s First Labor Case: Workers, 0; Capital,