The COVID-19 pandemic has created enormous challenges for the American workforce. Tens of millions of workers are now out of work, and workers who are still employed must navigate their jobs while trying to avoid the risk of infecting themselves and their communities. Employers do not appear to be providing essential workers increased pay or

In the CARES Act, the government offered different types of financial relief to businesses based on their size. There is a clear trend: the bigger the company, the fewer the requirements to use government aid to help its workers. Recent experience shows that we shouldn’t trust big American corporations to put the interests of their

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Let’s start with the obvious: We are experiencing the worst labor market since the Great Depression, if not ever. Since the COVID-19 crisis began, the employment-to-population ratio has cratered to a record low 51.3 percent, with nearly 43 million Americans unemployed or underemployed in April. That figure is likely to worsen in May, as about

Labor market monopsony exists when firms can wield outsized power to offer lower wages. Though antitrust enforcement can address monopsony, it isn’t enough; more robust labor regulations and protections are necessary, especially in markets characterized by low concentration and little use of anticompetitive practices. In Antitrust-Plus: Evaluating Additional Policies to Tackle Labor Monopsony, Roosevelt Fellow

Person looking into unemployment office window

The Department of Labor (DOL) was slated to release the latest data on unemployment filings tomorrow (the announcement is delayed until May 8), figures that will provide a staggering picture of COVID-19’s devastating effects on workers and our economy. Though not unexpected, these findings must shape the strategy, size, and scope for America’s economic recovery. 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:April 30, 2020 CONTACT:Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org American Labor Law Is Broken; Worker Survey Data Tells Us How it Fails and How to Fix ItNew Roosevelt report outlines new criteria for workplace law reform New York, NY—Worker power in the United States has long been in a downward spiral. Over the past five decades,

American labor and employment law is broken—affording workers little voice and few rights—and the COVID-19 pandemic has cast these failings in sharp relief. But even before the coronavirus crisis, a growing number of labor activists, policymakers, and academics have been calling for a fundamental overhaul of workplace law. In American Workers’ Experiences with Power, Information,

From the lack of paid sick leave to a shortage of hospital beds, the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed glaring problems in our social infrastructure. Those who remain on the job in essential industries risk exposure, and therefore their lives, every day. The threat posed to working people today is both an immediate crisis and also

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:April 24, 2020 CONTACT:Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org Worker Voice in the Time of COVID-19New report explores how and why front-line workers must be guaranteed a voice in the next stimulus bill New York, NY—Frontline workers’ strikes and protests have made clear that workers have been excluded from decision-making in response to the COVID-19 crisis.

In the last three weeks, it has become clear that millennials are going to experience a second major recession in their working lives before they turn 40. Even before the COVID-19 crisis, it was widely documented that this generation—ages 24 to 39 and the most racially diverse adult cohort in history—was experiencing long-term harms from