Corporate profits and executive pay are sky high today, while wages for most American workers have remained low and stagnant over the past several decades. Today’s high-profit, low-wage economy is, in part, a result of rules and policies that shape corporate decision-making. These rules have allowed CEOs, shareholders, and executives to move more and more

Our nation is faced with once-in-a-generation challenges—widespread inequality, alarming climate change, crumbling infrastructure, and crippling household debt, among others—that can only be addressed with bold, progressive policies, many of which require significant government spending. Although some policymakers and candidates have proposed such policies, they often get pushback from skeptics asking, “Can the government really afford

Late last month, the Business Roundtable (BRT)—a collection of 181 of the country’s largest corporations—announced that it was breaking from over 20 years of precedent. Instead of prioritizing shareholder value over everything else, the BRT declared that it would elevate the interests of all other stakeholders—including customers, communities, and suppliers—alongside it. Most notably, the very

In a new working paper, Roosevelt Senior Economist and Fellow Lenore Palladino argues that the 21st century American economy requires a new, more accurate, and more effective model for corporate governance—one that can advance worker power and employee representation within American corporations and curb inequality. As it stands, outsized shareholder power is contributing to rising economic

Progressing Ahead in 2019

Summers are never slow at Roosevelt, and now we’re gearing up for an even busier fall. At the top of our to-do list is explaining how and why the public sector must make big investments to tackle our nation’s toughest challenges; promoting our ideas to influence the Democratic presidential debate; and welcoming two new fellows

America’s $1.6 trillion student debt crisis is crushing millions of us, but it is disproportionately harming Black people—and fueling the racial wealth gap.  In a new Roosevelt report, co-released with Demos and The Century Foundation, Roosevelt Program Manager Suzanne Kahn and her coauthors underscore that our debt-financed higher education system reinforces the structural racism that plagues

On July 9 and 10, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testified before Congress regarding the Fed’s conduct of monetary policy. Both his prepared testimony and his responses to legislators’ pointed questioning marked a dramatic departure from the consensus that has long guided macroeconomic policy in the United States. When historians write the story of American

Between machines and outsourcing, technological change and trade in the 21st century have impacted much of how the American economy functions. As a result, workers are not only facing renewed challenges in their day-to-day experience on the job, with algorithmic scheduling and greater management surveillance, for example; but also in their experience within the economy

For too long, the building blocks of a good life, including solid benefits, strong wages, and safe working conditions, have been left to the whim of markets and employers rather than guaranteed for all. In today’s economy, curbing corporate and employer power and reclaiming public power are essential steps toward addressing the collective changes that

Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) and Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal (D-CA) introduced the Domestic Workers Bill of Rights today, backed by the National Domestic Workers Alliance. The bill would provide essential workplace rights and protections to a group of workers who have long been left out of basic standards for safety, security, pay, and well-being—in part because