As of late, I’ve been doing my utmost to find the silver linings of an otherwise frightening, frustrating, and disappointing news cycle—a rather difficult task in this political moment. There’s the legal fight brewing over Roe v. Wade, and Emily Peck’s sobering piece in HuffPost on the economic peril faced by women—and especially women of

Each Saturday, a Roosevelt staff member will share 3-5 articles that they consider must-reads. This week, Roosevelt Fellow Katy Milani is reading Emily Stewart’s piece in Vox on the influence that Occupy Wall Street played in shaping progressives’ economic policy ideas, including free college, the $15 minimum wage, and efforts to combat climate change: “[T]oday,

Every year during Women’s History Month, we celebrate the strides that women have made throughout history. In the fight for dignity and equity on the job, the government played a crucial—albeit imperfect—role in ensuring that women today are better off than their sisters of past generations. Yet, workplace equality remains out of reach for many.

Vox published an excellent discussion with economist Brad Delong where he makes the argument on why left-leaning neoliberals (who “use market means to social democratic ends when they are more effective, and they often are”) should be comfortable with the “baton rightly pass[ing] to our colleagues on our left. We are still here, but it

Labor and Wages

Workers today are increasingly powerless. A decades-long attack on unionization has eroded workers’ agency over their own economic lives. At the same time, employers have expanded their influence in the labor market, gaining the discretion to set wages and working conditions on their own terms without fear that workers could check their power by finding

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The United States has a labor monopsony problem. Though legal tools are already in place to combat monopsony, they have only been used against the most obvious forms of anticompetitive conduct like no-poaching agreements. More generally, there has been virtually no enforcement against abuses of monopsony power in labor markets. In a Roosevelt Institute working

In partnership with the Economic Policy Institute, Roosevelt Research Associate Adil Abdela and Research Director and Fellow Marshall Steinbaum examine the impact of the proposed Sprint/T-Mobile merger on the labor market. Cutting the number of national players in the U.S. wireless industry from four to three, this move would escalate market power in the industry

Last week, Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) introduced a sweeping, bold economic policy idea: the LIFT the Middle Class Act. The LIFT (Livable Incomes for Families) Act would essentially be a dramatic expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), making it much larger and available to many more Americans. A few days later, the conservative

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 4, 2018 CONTACT: Mariam Ahmed, mariam.ahmed@berlinrosen.com   THE CALL TO REPLACE SHAREHOLDER PRIMACY: RESHAPING CORPORATE LAW TO PROMOTE WORKERS’ INTERESTS, A BETTER ECONOMY Roosevelt Institute brief calls for decentering shareholders in corporate decision-making NEW YORK, NY  – The Roosevelt Institute today released a new issue brief, Towards ‘Accountable Capitalism’: Remaking Corporate

In Left Behind: Snapshots from the 21st Century Labor Market, Roosevelt Program Director Rakeen Mabud and Program Associate Jess Forden explore today’s changing economy and the future of work through the lens of six occupations: carework, food service, manufacturing, mining, nursing, and trucking. Despite a seemingly robust and healthy economy, as indicated by headline measures