My experience with the Roosevelt Institute is linked to the person I admire most in politics: Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA). When I entered my first year of college at UCLA, I aspired to attend law school one day; public policy was not on my professional radar, and I was pessimistic about politics in general. At

From the lack of paid sick leave to a shortage of hospital beds, the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed glaring problems in our social infrastructure. Those who remain on the job in essential industries risk exposure, and therefore their lives, every day. The threat posed to working people today is both an immediate crisis and also

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:April 24, 2020 CONTACT:Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org Worker Voice in the Time of COVID-19New report explores how and why front-line workers must be guaranteed a voice in the next stimulus bill New York, NY—Frontline workers’ strikes and protests have made clear that workers have been excluded from decision-making in response to the COVID-19 crisis.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 9, 2020 Progressive Group Leaders to Congress: Major Federal Intervention Needed to Meet Scale of Crisis; Congress Must Put People Ahead of Corporations to Save Economy Washington, DC – Today, leaders of progressive research, policy, and advocacy groups released the following statement calling on Congress to move quickly to pass a robust

Something unprecedented has happened in recent weeks. The passage of the CARES Act—the largest stimulus package in American history—and broader debates about government spending, production, and health care have fundamentally shifted the political paradigm. As the coronavirus pandemic ravages an already fragile economy, consensus is building, even among the deficit scolds of 2008–2009, around the

A Village Named Roosevelt

As a second-year law student at the University of Georgia School of Law, I spend most of my time poring through case law, analyzing hypotheticals, and developing my ability to advocate for marginalized and low-income clients. The foundation of these pursuits, however, was developed long ago.  I started college at the University of Georgia in

The reparations debate is longstanding and deep-rooted. In our forthcoming book, From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the 21st Century (University of North Carolina Press, April 2020), we advance the following general definition of reparations: “a program of acknowledgement, redress, and closure for a grievous injustice.” Acknowledgement is the admission of wrong

Today’s progressivism contends that economic rights are human rights. Rights to fundamental goods, such as health care and housing, are regarded as inalienable—as much a part of freedom as core rights like bodily autonomy. The view is consistent with the notion of the “American dream,” in that one must secure and then transcend each of

“I understood that my responsibility as a student activist wasn’t simply to call attention to what was wrong but to work diligently to make it right. And I have tried to live that life, every day” —Stacey Abrams On Saturday, January 11th, Stacey Abrams shared her hopeful wisdom with over 100 Roosevelt Network students, alumni,

In the wake of President Trump’s election in 2016, my friends and I at the George Washington University (GW) were anxious about health insurance. We worried that Trump and a Republican legislature might overturn the entire Affordable Care Act. A loss of protections allowing young people to stay on their parents’ health insurance until age