Ten years after the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the cost of health care continues to rise faster than wages, and millions of Americans are uninsured or underinsured—a toxic combination during a global pandemic.  While further action on the Hill has stalled, several state legislatures have sought to go beyond the ACA by

In the CARES Act, the government offered different types of financial relief to businesses based on their size. There is a clear trend: the bigger the company, the fewer the requirements to use government aid to help its workers. Recent experience shows that we shouldn’t trust big American corporations to put the interests of their

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Citing cost concerns, House Democrats amended their latest coronavirus response package yesterday to exclude a proposal that would have cancelled up to $10,000 in student debt for more than 45 million Americans. The new proposal offers cancellation only to a narrow group of “economically distressed” borrowers. This change is worrisome, not only because it leaves

The COVID-19 pandemic poses deep and intertwined structural threats to an American economy that was already fragile. When the virus struck, the US had far greater wealth and income inequality than other advanced nations, and far larger coverage gaps in health and social insurance—from paid leave to unemployment insurance. As always, those inequalities were starker

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From the lack of paid sick leave to a shortage of hospital beds, the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed glaring problems in our social infrastructure. Those who remain on the job in essential industries risk exposure, and therefore their lives, every day. The threat posed to working people today is both an immediate crisis and also

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:April 24, 2020 CONTACT:Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org Worker Voice in the Time of COVID-19New report explores how and why front-line workers must be guaranteed a voice in the next stimulus bill New York, NY—Frontline workers’ strikes and protests have made clear that workers have been excluded from decision-making in response to the COVID-19 crisis.

The COVID-19 pandemic is exposing structural flaws in our economy that have made the crisis far worse than it should have been. Rampant inequality, disinvestment in public institutions, and a persistent erosion of worker protections have created a precarious economy that has collapsed under the immediate crisis. Congress has acted quickly, appropriating billions of dollars

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:April 16, 2020 CONTACT:Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org Lessons from the CARES Act: Banking for All in the Time of COVID-19New Roosevelt report explores why an economy that works for all requires financial inclusion policy New York, NY – As part of Congress’s financial stimulus response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the CARES Act included $1,200

As part of Congress’s financial stimulus response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the CARES Act included $1,200 stimulus checks to all qualifying Americans—but there was no clear plan for delivering these checks to unbanked and underbanked Americans. Unfortunately, financial inclusion—access to payment systems, credit products, and financial services of all kinds—is an afterthought in politics and

In striking ways, the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has exposed the fragility of the US economy and the immense power disparities and systemic disadvantages built into our social contract. Tens of millions of people across entire sectors of our economy are out of work—and many were living paycheck to paycheck before this crisis hit. Right now, the Roosevelt Institute’s work