For decades, regulators have had only limited success in taming a for-profit college industry that routinely defrauds students, inflates prices, and produces devastatingly bad outcomes for student loan borrowers. But recently, instead of promoting complex regulatory schemes, some policymakers have offered a simple solution: take away for-profit colleges’ federal subsidies. Today, Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-WA)

This week, Roosevelt Communications Manager Ariela Weinberger is reading an Axios article on how automation will negatively impact the racial wealth gap—especially for Black workers—and a New York Times op-ed from economists Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman on the future of tax justice and how absurd it is that “the working class is now paying

Late last month, the Business Roundtable (BRT)—a collection of 181 of the country’s largest corporations—announced that it was breaking from over 20 years of precedent. Instead of prioritizing shareholder value over everything else, the BRT declared that it would elevate the interests of all other stakeholders—including customers, communities, and suppliers—alongside it. Most notably, the very

America’s $1.6 trillion student debt crisis is crushing millions of us, but it is disproportionately harming Black people—and fueling the racial wealth gap.  In a new Roosevelt report, co-released with Demos and The Century Foundation, Roosevelt Program Manager Suzanne Kahn and her coauthors underscore that our debt-financed higher education system reinforces the structural racism that plagues

The $1.6 trillion student debt crisis is holding back many Americans, but it is especially damaging to racial equality. Already disadvantaged by generational wealth disparities, Black students and their families end up paying more for college than white families do, and they get a lot less in the end. To build a higher education system

Student debt cancellation is generating the most online attention out of all of the Democratic presidential candidates’ policy proposals, according to a new analysis. Given that issues like health care or immigration are usually what voters care most about, this is a notable shift. It’s not just the subject of student debt that has captured

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 30, 2019 CONTACT: Kendra Bozarth, kbozarth@rooseveltinstitute.org Reviving Industrial Policy and Economy-Wide Planning in the Time of Global Crises New Roosevelt report explores the role of democratic industrial policy in tackling America’s greatest global threats The US faces numerous challenges—from climate change to trade competition—that make a more robust industrial policy and

After a few decades’ absence, industrial policy is back in the national conversation, with support from leading academics, grassroots movements, and politicians ranging from Sen. Elizabeth Warren to Sen. Marco Rubio. Despite its dormancy in the public debate, industrial policy and planning lie at the heart of many capitalist economies—and both should anchor the future

For too long, the building blocks of a good life, including solid benefits, strong wages, and safe working conditions, have been left to the whim of markets and employers rather than guaranteed for all. In today’s economy, curbing corporate and employer power and reclaiming public power are essential steps toward addressing the collective changes that

Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) and Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal (D-CA) introduced the Domestic Workers Bill of Rights today, backed by the National Domestic Workers Alliance. The bill would provide essential workplace rights and protections to a group of workers who have long been left out of basic standards for safety, security, pay, and well-being—in part because