Janelle Jones, the managing director of policy and research at Groundwork Collaborative, has coined what she calls a personal motto and economic ideology: “Black women best.” She means that if Black women—who, since our nation’s founding, have been the most disadvantaged by the rules that structure our society—can one day thrive in the economy, then

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:March 31, 2019 CONTACT:Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org High Profits, Low Wages, and Discrimination: Corporate America and the Double Wage Gap A Roosevelt report explores how US corporations make billions in profit from the gender and racial wage gaps, even before the coronavirus New York, NY—Since the 1980s, American corporations have seen their profits skyrocket,

Over the last several decades, a rise in worker productivity and flat wages have driven record-high corporate profits in the US. As the private, for-profit sector benefited, economic insecurity has increased and wage gaps persist. This is especially true for Black women, who face both the gender wage gap and the racial wage gap—a reinforcing

The reparations debate is longstanding and deep-rooted. In our forthcoming book, From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the 21st Century (University of North Carolina Press, April 2020), we advance the following general definition of reparations: “a program of acknowledgement, redress, and closure for a grievous injustice.” Acknowledgement is the admission of wrong

Today’s progressivism contends that economic rights are human rights. Rights to fundamental goods, such as health care and housing, are regarded as inalienable—as much a part of freedom as core rights like bodily autonomy. The view is consistent with the notion of the “American dream,” in that one must secure and then transcend each of

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:February 5, 2020 CONTACT:Ariela Weinberger, aweinberger@rooseveltinstitute.org Going Beyond Black History Month: Naming Anti-Blackness to Address Racial Wealth Inequality A new report highlights why progressives must focus on addressing the structural forces that cause the racial wealth gap, not just fixate on the gap itself New York, NY—Over the last 50 years, neoliberal (“free

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Inequality is a defining American issue, and perhaps no measure more accurately exemplifies the failures and injustices of historic and current-day economic decisions than the “racial wealth gap.” In the current political moment—when bold ideas to rebalance economic and political power, especially by race, are central to public debate—we have the opportunity to reevaluate how

In The Contribution of Shareholder Primacy to the Racial Wealth Gap, Roosevelt Fellow Lenore Palladino explores several ways of evaluating the impact of disparate equity ownership, and payments to shareholders, on racial wealth disparities. Using data from the Federal Reserve’s Distributional Financial Accounts and S&P Compustat, Palladino measures corporate equity ownership by race and ethnicity

The US economy has been structured by rules that either privilege or exploit people based on their race. Our nation’s legacy of implicit and explicit racial exclusions continue to have a deep impact on who is able to meaningfully participate and profit in the current American economy and who is left behind. The racialized policy

For decades, regulators have had only limited success in taming a for-profit college industry that routinely defrauds students, inflates prices, and produces devastatingly bad outcomes for student loan borrowers. But recently, instead of promoting complex regulatory schemes, some policymakers have offered a simple solution: take away for-profit colleges’ federal subsidies. Today, Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-WA)