In Left Behind: Snapshots from the 21st Century Labor Market, Roosevelt Program Director Rakeen Mabud and Program Associate Jess Forden explore today’s changing economy and the future of work through the lens of six occupations: carework, food service, manufacturing, mining, nursing, and trucking. Despite a seemingly robust and healthy economy, as indicated by headline measures

Why This Matters is a series from Roosevelt staff connecting our individual work—from papers to reports and everything in between—to our broader vision of creating a better, more equitable economic and political system. This series will give readers the top takeaways from our latest writing and thinking, with a focus on why they matter as we

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 24, 2018 CONTACT: Jennifer Miller, jmiller@rooseveltinstitute.org   NEW ROOSEVELT INSTITUTE REPORT HIGHLIGHTS THE HARMFUL RACIAL IMPACTS OF THE GOP TAX LAW Latest Analysis From Leading Progressive Think Tank Argues Tax Overhaul ‘Preys Upon People of Color’   NEW YORK, NY — Earlier today, the Roosevelt Institute released its latest issue brief: Hidden

The federal tax code is one of the most powerful tools of economic policymaking, housing critical rules that govern our economy. As such, it is also home to a set of hidden racial rules that, through intention or neglect, provide opportunities to some communities and create barriers for others. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act,

Increased monopsony in labor markets has allowed corporations to gain outsized power over individuals, leaving workers with less agency over the choices in their lives. Labor market monopsony refers to the concentration of employers and the resulting power they have to shape labor markets to their advantage. More concentration leads to fewer employers who offer

Last week, a bipartisan group of senators voted to roll back regulations put in place in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. Those regulations rewrote the rules of our banking system that had long prioritized profits over people—a system that for generations exploited and perpetuated racial inequities and ultimately foiled the financial wellbeing of

Presentation to the Congressional Antitrust Caucus, Panel Remarks February 16, 2018 Today, economists and average Americans are confused by the same puzzle: We see historically high corporate profits and low corporate investment. In a productive economy, high profits and low investment aren’t supposed to occur simultaneously. So how do we explain what is going on?

The Levy Institute recently released a research paper I co-wrote with Stephanie Kelton, Scott Fulwiler, and Catherine Ruetschlin that models the macroeconomic impact of cancelling all of the student debt that is currently outstanding in the United States—just over $1.4 trillion, held by between 40 and 50 million borrowers. The federal government would write off

President Trump ran on a platform of “Make America Great Again.” A familiar retort was that America was still great. But it was not as great as it could be. Its greatness arises not so much from its military power, but from its soft power and its economic power. In today’s world, America’s continued racism

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Welcome to the inaugural edition of Why This Matters, a new series from Roosevelt staff connecting our individual work—from papers to reports and everything in between—to our broader vision of creating a new, more equitable economic and political system. This series will give readers the top takeaways from our latest writing and thinking, with a focus on why

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