Today, the power of corporations is vastly limiting our ability to access key public goods like water, healthcare, education, internet, and transport.  Such corporate power has ensured that the public goods we need most are neither equitable nor accessible. Equally, we are unable to hold such private actors- from charter schools to private prison companies

Re:Public

What do the increase in for-profit colleges and private prisons have in common? Unchecked corporate power in our public institutions. Lack of public control over the provision of public goods demands action now. Our future is not for sale. A mainstay in our politics since post World War II and now embedded in our highest political offices,

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Vast public resources have been transferred from public control to private hands without an increase in public oversight. This process is known as privatization. This lack of democratic control makes it harder to hold private companies accountable and transparent. A mainstay in our politics since post war II and now embedded in our highest political

“Higher education” is a vague term. It describes a sector that is hardly uniform, with over 4,000 degree-granting institutions eligible for federal funding but serious disparities among them. A college education from one of these institutions continues to serve as a prerequisite to moving up the income ladder in our narrative about economic mobility. Yet,

What do the increase in for-profit colleges and private prisons have in common? Unchecked corporate power in our public institutions. Lack of public control over the provision of public goods demands action now.To combat this trend and promote the public good, we’ve launched the Re:Public Project. For more information, visit our project page.

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Vast public resources have been transferred from public control to private hands without an increase in public oversight. This process is known as privatization. This lack of democratic control makes it harder to hold private companies accountable and transparent. A mainstay in our politics since post war II and now embedded in our highest political

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Dear partners, students, and alumni, Thank you for helping us spread the word about the Roosevelt Institute Network Re:Public Project. Please use the hashtag #WhoseRules when sharing with your community. More information on the Re:Public Project available here: https://rooseveltinstitute.org/republicproject/ Sample Facebook and Twitter posts Politicians are giving power of public goods to private hands. We

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In “The Threat of Privatization for the Emerging Generation” below, Roosevelt’s Joelle Gamble and Aman Banerji, document the rise of Privatization- the process through which basic public goods such as water, education, and energy, are sold off to the private sector in the name of efficiency and cost reduction for taxpayers. They argue that the

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Higher education in the U.S. is in a state of crisis. We see evidence of this crisis in huge cuts in funding for public schools, skyrocketing costs of attendance at both private and public schools, and increases in student debt burdens. Financialization has a number of disturbing consequences for higher education, including increases in overall

Re:Public Project

What do the increase in for-profit colleges and private prisons have in common? Unchecked corporate power in our public institutions. Lack of public control over the provision of public goods demands action now. Our future is not for sale.     A mainstay in our politics since post World War II and now embedded in our highest

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