For decades, literature on the international dimension of tax injustice has focused on the conflict between tax havens and developed welfare states. The Panamas and Cayman Islands of the world helped rich individuals and corporations shield their assets from tax collectors, largely unchallenged before the financial crisis because states were unable or unwilling to build

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In response to “The Starving State: Why Capitalism’s Salvation Depends on Taxation” by Joseph E. Stiglitz, Gabriel Zucman, and Todd Tucker for Foreign Affairs, the Roosevelt Institute is hosting a blog symposium to further examine the history of international tax rules and the path ahead toward more inclusive and fair international tax policies. Opening the

The negotiations on corporate taxation at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) BEPS Inclusive Framework initiative have rightly generated much discussion, both on the process and on the proposed changes in tax policies. Allison Christians has pointed to several concerns that developing countries have with both: the proposal is one that has maximum

The global fight over how—and where—to tax the new digital economy is raging on. Just last week, the Office of the US Trade Representative (USTR) published the conclusions from its investigation into France’s new tax on large tech companies, such as Apple, Facebook, and Google. The USTR found that the French tax discriminates against US

I’m pleased to be able to kick off Roosevelt’s blog symposium on international tax rules, joined by Rasmus Corlin Christensen of Copenhagen Business School, Valpy Fitzgerald from Oxford, Jayati Ghosh from Jawaharlal Nehru University, and Martin Hearson from Sussex. Additional thanks to Tommaso Faccio of ICRICT for helping coordinate. We are anchoring our blog symposium

This week, Roosevelt Communications Manager Ariela Weinberger is reading an Axios article on how automation will negatively impact the racial wealth gap—especially for Black workers—and a New York Times op-ed from economists Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman on the future of tax justice and how absurd it is that “the working class is now paying

Imagine a world in which the most pressing issue is to slash taxes for the rich and only the rich, costing the US government hundreds of billions of dollars and doing little to spur economic growth. Imagine a policy so unequal that even Mitt Romney has his doubts. Reader, I give you the capital gains

This blog post is based off of remarks given at “Wall Street and the Next Recession: Protecting Main Street in the Next Economic Downturn,” an event co-sponsored by Americans for Financial Reform and the Center for Popular Democracy at the US Senate. One thing is certain about markets: they go up and they go down.

Last week, Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) introduced a sweeping, bold economic policy idea: the LIFT the Middle Class Act. The LIFT (Livable Incomes for Families) Act would essentially be a dramatic expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), making it much larger and available to many more Americans. A few days later, the conservative

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 22, 2018 CONTACT: Lauren Strayer, media@voterstudygroup.org (202) 420-7928 Jack D’Amato, media@voterstudygroup.org (404) 995-4500   New Report: Most Americans Skeptical that New Tax Cuts Will Help Them Study also finds that the public at large, including Republican voters, favor tax cuts for the middle class and poor rather than corporations.   Washington,

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