For decades, literature on the international dimension of tax injustice has focused on the conflict between tax havens and developed welfare states. The Panamas and Cayman Islands of the world helped rich individuals and corporations shield their assets from tax collectors, largely unchallenged before the financial crisis because states were unable or unwilling to build

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In response to “The Starving State: Why Capitalism’s Salvation Depends on Taxation” by Joseph E. Stiglitz, Gabriel Zucman, and Todd Tucker for Foreign Affairs, the Roosevelt Institute is hosting a blog symposium to further examine the history of international tax rules and the path ahead toward more inclusive and fair international tax policies. Opening the

The negotiations on corporate taxation at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) BEPS Inclusive Framework initiative have rightly generated much discussion, both on the process and on the proposed changes in tax policies. Allison Christians has pointed to several concerns that developing countries have with both: the proposal is one that has maximum

The global fight over how—and where—to tax the new digital economy is raging on. Just last week, the Office of the US Trade Representative (USTR) published the conclusions from its investigation into France’s new tax on large tech companies, such as Apple, Facebook, and Google. The USTR found that the French tax discriminates against US

I’m pleased to be able to kick off Roosevelt’s blog symposium on international tax rules, joined by Rasmus Corlin Christensen of Copenhagen Business School, Valpy Fitzgerald from Oxford, Jayati Ghosh from Jawaharlal Nehru University, and Martin Hearson from Sussex. Additional thanks to Tommaso Faccio of ICRICT for helping coordinate. We are anchoring our blog symposium

Our nation is faced with once-in-a-generation challenges—widespread inequality, alarming climate change, crumbling infrastructure, and crippling household debt, among others—that can only be addressed with bold, progressive policies, many of which require significant government spending. Although some policymakers and candidates have proposed such policies, they often get pushback from skeptics asking, “Can the government really afford

Imagine a world in which the most pressing issue is to slash taxes for the rich and only the rich, costing the US government hundreds of billions of dollars and doing little to spur economic growth. Imagine a policy so unequal that even Mitt Romney has his doubts. Reader, I give you the capital gains

On Thursday, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released new estimates of the US “tax gap,” which measures the difference between the taxes people, corporations, and other entities legally owe and what is actually collected. The tax gap totals nearly $8 trillion over the past decade, according to the chief mathematician (#MathIsReal) for the Senate Budget

Corporate profits are at record highs and unemployment is below 5 percent, yet 40 percent of Americans say that they would not be able to meet a $400 emergency. For too long we’ve been guided by the 50-year-old myth that fewer regulations and lower taxes on corporations and the wealthy will lead to economic growth

Companies today are not working the way that most Americans, policymakers, or the media think that they do. To fight inequality, we need to rewrite the laws that guide corporations. We must first, however, change the way that people understand the role of the American firm in our economy and explore how we can deploy