How does corporate power suppress worker wages? And why has it hit rural America especially hard? Please join Roosevelt Research Director Marshall Steinbaum and CNN’s Lydia DePillis on March 23 for a conversation about a key force driving Americans’ economic insecurity. Steinbaum’s latest research reveals how employers are using increasingly concentrated corporate power to shape the labor market

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: March 6, 2018 CONTACT: Alexander Tucciarone, atucciarone@rooseveltinstitute.org, 516-263-9775   STATEMENT: Roosevelt Institute Senior Economist Applauds ‘The Worker Dividend Act’ Introduced by Senator Cory A. Booker Measure would require companies to provide a commensurate benefit for employees when CEOs, shareholders benefit from stock buybacks   NEW YORK, NY — Earlier today, Senator Cory

On Tuesday night, President Trump spent a good portion of his first State of the Union address boasting about the economy. He talked about the stock market, which is on an unprecedented nine-year run; he talked about low unemployment, which sits near a historic low; and he talked about wages, which are starting to rise

Larry Fink’s annual letter to CEOs is making waves for its pronouncement that “companies must benefit all of their stakeholders, including shareholders, employees, customers, and the communities in which they operate.” Fink is the head of $6.3 trillion dollar asset manager BlackRock and the leader of a rising chorus calling on companies to stop focusing

During last night’s State of the Union address, President Trump heralded a set of economic indicators—including the unemployment rate—to suggest that his policies are resulting in an improving economic landscape for working Americans. Unfortunately, the narrative Trump wove obscures the reality of our current economy for most Americans: jobs remain unstable and unavailable for many,

On Wednesday a handful of U.S.-based corporations, with AT&T leading the way, announced that, in light of the recently passed tax bill, they will be giving their employees a one-time bonus. Before anyone else begins claiming that this tax bill is going to spur business investment and favor the working class, let’s remember a few

The problem of labor market monopsony—buyer power among employers—has gotten increasing attention in recent years, including in my 2016 Roosevelt Institute paper with Roosevelt fellow Mike Konczal, in a Council of Economic Advisors issue brief, and in a widely-circulated paper by economist Simcha Barkai. The basic idea of monopsony is that if employers don’t have

Despite record corporate profits and high stock prices, most Americans have not shared in the post-recession recovery. In a new Roosevelt Institute report, Fellows Mike Konczal and J.W. Mason discuss how the Great Recession changed the way the Federal Reserve (the Fed) uses macroeconomic monetary policy—a set of rules influencing the supply of credit and

Yesterday, two nominees went before the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee for a chance to become the next commissioners of the Securities and Exchange Commission. We were thrilled to see Senator Brian Schatz ask the nominees to give their thoughts about the stock buyback “safe harbor,” Rule 10b-18, and even more excited that both

“Market Power Rising” Panel on Antitrust in the Labor Market, Opening Remarks September 25, 2017 Antitrust policy has typically viewed monopsony power in the labor market as arising from an essentially competitive context—if it exists at all. The maintained assumption in the antitrust orthodoxy has been that the economy is on or near its production