“Market Power Rising” Panel on Antitrust in the Labor Market, Opening Remarks September 25, 2017 Antitrust policy has typically viewed monopsony power in the labor market as arising from an essentially competitive context—if it exists at all. The maintained assumption in the antitrust orthodoxy has been that the economy is on or near its production

Despite energetic conversations around stagnant wages and job creation, few consider that the financialization of America’s public corporations has contributed just as much to economic inequality as more commonly-cited factors. The debate seems well-settled: scholars point to globalization[1], skill-biased technical change[2], and the decline of union density[3]. Others point to the “rise of the robots”[4],

Our colleagues at the Roosevelt Institute, together with the Levy Institute, just published an exciting new paper entitled, “Modeling the Macroeconomic Effects of a Universal Basic Income.” The paper takes a major step forward in answering an important question: How would a massive federal spending program like a “universal basic income” (UBI) affect economic growth