Matt Hughes

Matt Hughes is the Roosevelt Institute’s Senior Manager of Editorial Strategy. He was previously a junior research fellow focused on pharmaceutical economics and regulatory capture.
Prior to joining Roosevelt, Matt worked in the Office of Joseph E. Stiglitz at Columbia University and at a public finance law firm specializing in affordable housing. He has also served in the Office of US Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and the New York City Mayor’s Office of Veterans Affairs.

Matt earned his BA in economics and politics from New York University. He holds an MPA in urban policy; technology, media, and communications; and management from Columbia University.

We’ve long known this: A health care system hinged on employer-sponsored insurance is unequal, inefficient, and ill-equipped for an employment crisis. Amid a global pandemic and unprecedented job loss, no one can argue this: The US’s patchwork health insurance system has needlessly imperiled the lives and economic security of many, especially our nation’s most vulnerable. 

Chart showing how Hispanic or Latinx people are disproportionately represented in

Last week, another 3 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits, bringing the total to 36.5 million since the pandemic began.  In the latest #ProgressingAhead Twitter chat, some of the brightest minds in economic policy shared their takeaways and possible solutions for what is already the deepest employment crisis since the Great Depression. Black, Latinx, and

Let’s start with the obvious: We are experiencing the worst labor market since the Great Depression, if not ever. Since the COVID-19 crisis began, the employment-to-population ratio has cratered to a record low 51.3 percent, with nearly 43 million Americans unemployed or underemployed in April. That figure is likely to worsen in May, as about

The Great Democracy Initiative’s (GDI) latest report on how Dodd-Frank regulatory powers could be used to curb carbon financing offers an innovative approach to addressing the climate crisis. For the Roosevelt Network, it also reminds us that this wouldn’t be possible without the groundwork of youth-led divestiture movements that have increasingly gained momentum in recent

In the absence of federal climate legislation and amidst a regulatory rollback both sweeping and relentless in nature, it’s no wonder that majorities of Americans believe that our government is doing too little to address the climate crisis. A potential salve for that eco-anxiety: Whenever it’s ready, the executive branch alone could take unprecedented—and legally

Against the backdrop of a $1.6 trillion student debt crisis and declining college enrollment, free college has emerged as a political lightning rod in today’s higher education debate. Questions about who should and will benefit⁠—and what “free” even means⁠—have created a free-for-whom free-for-all, with proposals varying both by student and institutional access. To evaluate these

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