The COVID-19 pandemic has created enormous challenges for the American workforce. Tens of millions of workers are now out of work, and workers who are still employed must navigate their jobs while trying to avoid the risk of infecting themselves and their communities. Employers do not appear to be providing essential workers increased pay or

Today’s black-white wealth gap originated with the unfulfilled promise of 40 acres in 1865. The payment of this debt in the 21st century is feasible—and at least 155 years overdue.  In From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the Twenty-First Century, William Darity Jr. and A. Kirsten Mullen advance a general definition of

Labor market monopsony exists when firms can wield outsized power to offer lower wages. Though antitrust enforcement can address monopsony, it isn’t enough; more robust labor regulations and protections are necessary, especially in markets characterized by low concentration and little use of anticompetitive practices. In Antitrust-Plus: Evaluating Additional Policies to Tackle Labor Monopsony, Roosevelt Fellow

The COVID-19 pandemic poses deep and intertwined structural threats to an American economy that was already fragile. When the virus struck, the US had far greater wealth and income inequality than other advanced nations, and far larger coverage gaps in health and social insurance—from paid leave to unemployment insurance. As always, those inequalities were starker

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American labor and employment law is broken—affording workers little voice and few rights—and the COVID-19 pandemic has cast these failings in sharp relief. But even before the coronavirus crisis, a growing number of labor activists, policymakers, and academics have been calling for a fundamental overhaul of workplace law. In American Workers’ Experiences with Power, Information,

As millions of Americans struggle during an acute and severe economic and public health crisis, we see a pervasive demand for Congress to take more sweeping, and long-term action on economic relief. New polling data from the Groundwork Collaborative and Roosevelt Institute find that Americans see past efforts as the beginning, not the end, and

From the lack of paid sick leave to a shortage of hospital beds, the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed glaring problems in our social infrastructure. Those who remain on the job in essential industries risk exposure, and therefore their lives, every day. The threat posed to working people today is both an immediate crisis and also

The COVID-19 pandemic is exposing structural flaws in our economy that have made the crisis far worse than it should have been. Rampant inequality, disinvestment in public institutions, and a persistent erosion of worker protections have created a precarious economy that has collapsed under the immediate crisis. Congress has acted quickly, appropriating billions of dollars

As part of Congress’s financial stimulus response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the CARES Act included $1,200 stimulus checks to all qualifying Americans—but there was no clear plan for delivering these checks to unbanked and underbanked Americans. Unfortunately, financial inclusion—access to payment systems, credit products, and financial services of all kinds—is an afterthought in politics and

Over the last several decades, a rise in worker productivity and flat wages have driven record-high corporate profits in the US. As the private, for-profit sector benefited, economic insecurity has increased and wage gaps persist. This is especially true for Black women, who face both the gender wage gap and the racial wage gap—a reinforcing