For decades, American workers have seen their power diminish and their wages barely budge. Today, Congress can reverse these trends and accelerate our economic recovery by implementing a fair wage guarantee. The unemployment insurance (UI) supplement that Congress enacted in response to the coronavirus pandemic in March has been an enormous success. Millions have been

As state and local governments face unprecedented revenue shortfalls over the next three fiscal years, many are considering slashing services and public sector employment at exactly the time they are needed most.  These moves have the potential to devastate communities and local economies, causing unnecessary hardship, deepening the recession, and hampering the eventual economic recovery.

In the past two decades, equal opportunities for people with disabilities (PWDs) have been outlined and guaranteed through two federal acts: the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act and the 2014 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. Intended to increase access to high-quality workforce services and preparation for competitive integrated employment, these federal acts set precedent for

Ten years after the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the cost of health care continues to rise faster than wages, and millions of Americans are uninsured or underinsured—a toxic combination during a global pandemic.  While further action on the Hill has stalled, several state legislatures have sought to go beyond the ACA by

As the United States grapples with ongoing social, health, and economic crises, policymakers are considering—and enacting—major changes at all levels of government. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, this includes bolstering existing programs, like unemployment insurance, and creating new initiatives, like grants and loans for small businesses and a new paid sick leave benefit. And

The COVID-19 pandemic has created enormous challenges for the American workforce. Tens of millions of workers are now out of work, and workers who are still employed must navigate their jobs while trying to avoid the risk of infecting themselves and their communities. Employers do not appear to be providing essential workers increased pay or

Today’s black-white wealth gap originated with the unfulfilled promise of 40 acres in 1865. The payment of this debt in the 21st century is feasible—and at least 155 years overdue.  In From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the Twenty-First Century, William Darity Jr. and A. Kirsten Mullen advance a general definition of

Labor market monopsony exists when firms can wield outsized power to offer lower wages. Though antitrust enforcement can address monopsony, it isn’t enough; more robust labor regulations and protections are necessary, especially in markets characterized by low concentration and little use of anticompetitive practices. In Antitrust-Plus: Evaluating Additional Policies to Tackle Labor Monopsony, Roosevelt Fellow

The COVID-19 pandemic poses deep and intertwined structural threats to an American economy that was already fragile. When the virus struck, the US had far greater wealth and income inequality than other advanced nations, and far larger coverage gaps in health and social insurance—from paid leave to unemployment insurance. As always, those inequalities were starker

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American labor and employment law is broken—affording workers little voice and few rights—and the COVID-19 pandemic has cast these failings in sharp relief. But even before the coronavirus crisis, a growing number of labor activists, policymakers, and academics have been calling for a fundamental overhaul of workplace law. In American Workers’ Experiences with Power, Information,