The Blog of the Roosevelt Institute

In a report released earlier this week, Roosevelt Fellow Todd Tucker explains what industrial policy is and how we can do it better. Notably, he argues that—despite the common but mistaken assumption that the US does not use industrial policy—ad hoc and exclusionary industrial policies have hindered the kind of robust industrial planning necessary to

Student debt cancellation is generating the most online attention out of all of the Democratic presidential candidates’ policy proposals, according to a new analysis. Given that issues like health care or immigration are usually what voters care most about, this is a notable shift. It’s not just the subject of student debt that has captured

The climate crisis is happening now. Across the planet, our oceans are warming, our weather is more extreme, and natural disasters are more frequent and more severe. And it’s only going to get worse: The UN predicts that by 2040, increased coastal flooding will affect nearly 50 million people, and a “disproportionately rapid evacuation” of

At least a quarter of the 2.3 million incarcerated people in US are addicted to opioids. The fact that our criminal justice system does not routinely provide treatment for opioid withdrawal or treat addiction as a disease is at best wasteful and counterproductive. Harsh drug laws ensure that we continue to see addiction as a

Between machines and outsourcing, technological change and trade in the 21st century have impacted much of how the American economy functions. As a result, workers are not only facing renewed challenges in their day-to-day experience on the job, with algorithmic scheduling and greater management surveillance, for example; but also in their experience within the economy

Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) and Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal (D-CA) introduced the Domestic Workers Bill of Rights today, backed by the National Domestic Workers Alliance. The bill would provide essential workplace rights and protections to a group of workers who have long been left out of basic standards for safety, security, pay, and well-being—in part because

Lenore Palladino, Roosevelt Senior Economist and Policy Counsel Question: What would you do about the runaway influence of shareholder power in the economy? Why It Matters: Most Americans are increasingly powerless in today’s economy and our democracy, especially workers. A decades-long shift in corporate governance has created an environment in which the interests of shareholders

Earlier this month, in a powerful act of solidarity, 36 Jewish activists were arrested for obstructing access to an ICE detention facility. It’s a salient reminder that step one of being an ally is knowing your history. I think often of how inextricably linked Asian Amerian history is with that of other people of color

In a working paper, Roosevelt Senior Economist and Policy Counsel Lenore Palladino investigates whether stock buybacks occur more frequently, independent of other factors, when corporate insiders are selling their own personal shareholdings. In her empirical analysis of the relationship between insider sales and stock buybacks, Palladino finds that a 10 percent increase in insider sales

In a week filled with much debate, I can’t help but think that some of the stage interactions we saw tell us little to nothing about what voters really care about when it comes to each candidate. Perhaps because I just finished reading Quiet (excellent read btw), debates to me only seem to reassert our