The Blog of the Roosevelt Institute

For the first time in our history, the climate crisis and how to combat it is the issue dominating the presidential debate. Many Democratic candidates have released climate proposals that seek to reduce carbon emissions in order to align with recommendations made by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Progressives should applaud the collective

Madam Chair Wilson, Madam Chair Adams, Ranking Members Walberg and Byrne, and members of the Subcommittees, thank you for this opportunity to testify today. I am a professor at Temple University law school, a visiting professor at Georgetown University Law Center, and a fellow at the Roosevelt Institute. I am here today in my capacity

Anyone who follows the DC budget game knows that the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) serves as its referee; any proposal that involves new spending or revenue is scored by the CBO for its impact on the federal debt over the next 10 years. That score normally sets the terms on which the proposal will be

For decades, regulators have had only limited success in taming a for-profit college industry that routinely defrauds students, inflates prices, and produces devastatingly bad outcomes for student loan borrowers. But recently, instead of promoting complex regulatory schemes, some policymakers have offered a simple solution: take away for-profit colleges’ federal subsidies. Today, Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-WA)

Amidst the major health care policy differences highlighted at Tuesday’s Democratic debate, we must not forget one telling statistic: While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has extended insurance coverage to millions, a majority of Americans who were uninsured prior to passage of the law still remain uninsured today.  Relative to the most credible forecasts from

Thank you, Chairwoman Maloney and Ranking Member Huizenga, for inviting me to speak today. It is an honor to be here. My name is Lenore Palladino, and I am Assistant Professor of Economics & Public Policy at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, a Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, and Research Associate at the Political Economy

This week, Roosevelt Communications Manager Ariela Weinberger is reading an Axios article on how automation will negatively impact the racial wealth gap—especially for Black workers—and a New York Times op-ed from economists Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman on the future of tax justice and how absurd it is that “the working class is now paying

Did Marketplace Coverage Really Offer Financial Protection? Financial Gains from the Affordable Care Act’s Private Insurance Policies for the Previously Uninsured While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) expanded health coverage to millions of Americans, more than half of the people eligible for the law’s private insurance marketplace remained uninsured. Today, most of those who were

Late last month, the Business Roundtable (BRT)—a collection of 181 of the country’s largest corporations—announced that it was breaking from over 20 years of precedent. Instead of prioritizing shareholder value over everything else, the BRT declared that it would elevate the interests of all other stakeholders—including customers, communities, and suppliers—alongside it. Most notably, the very

Imagine a world in which the most pressing issue is to slash taxes for the rich and only the rich, costing the US government hundreds of billions of dollars and doing little to spur economic growth. Imagine a policy so unequal that even Mitt Romney has his doubts. Reader, I give you the capital gains