The Blog of the Roosevelt Institute

Young people and students have been on the frontlines of movements for social change throughout our country’s history. And over the last few days, young people have joined protestors, across age, race, and class, and flooded the streets to demand justice—for George Floyd, for Breonna Taylor, for the disproportionate number of Black lives lost to

“It looks as if the system cannot reform itself,” said Dr. Cornel West this past Friday in discussing the public murder of George Floyd on May 25. In 5 minutes and 23 seconds, Dr. West delivers the powerful—and painful—truth: We are living in a moment of compounded systemic failures, at least those of us who

In the CARES Act, the government offered different types of financial relief to businesses based on their size. There is a clear trend: the bigger the company, the fewer the requirements to use government aid to help its workers. Recent experience shows that we shouldn’t trust big American corporations to put the interests of their

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Citing cost concerns, House Democrats amended their latest coronavirus response package yesterday to exclude a proposal that would have cancelled up to $10,000 in student debt for more than 45 million Americans. The new proposal offers cancellation only to a narrow group of “economically distressed” borrowers. This change is worrisome, not only because it leaves

Chart showing how Hispanic or Latinx people are disproportionately represented in

Last week, another 3 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits, bringing the total to 36.5 million since the pandemic began.  In the latest #ProgressingAhead Twitter chat, some of the brightest minds in economic policy shared their takeaways and possible solutions for what is already the deepest employment crisis since the Great Depression. Black, Latinx, and

Let’s start with the obvious: We are experiencing the worst labor market since the Great Depression, if not ever. Since the COVID-19 crisis began, the employment-to-population ratio has cratered to a record low 51.3 percent, with nearly 43 million Americans unemployed or underemployed in April. That figure is likely to worsen in May, as about

The United States is facing an unprecedented public health and economic crisis: over 82,000 dead, 20.5 million jobs lost in April, and a 15 percent unemployment rate. The scale and depth of the crisis are drawing parallels to World War II mobilization and the Great Depression. In fact, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House

The Roosevelts contributed so much to the way of life in America. Their story is worth knowing and celebrating. Understanding how personal their impact has been is seen here through the eyes of the Library’s dedicated supporters as they recount their favorite Roosevelt things. 5/29/20 Favorite place to visit on the Library and Museum grounds

Among the more novel ideas for responding to the COVID-19 crisis is the reboot of a long-forgotten New Deal-era institution: the Reconstruction Finance Corporation (RFC). Operating from 1932 to 1957, the agency lent and invested tens of billions of dollars to banks, manufacturers, state and local governments, federal agencies, and more—even creating whole industries from

Person looking into unemployment office window

The Department of Labor (DOL) was slated to release the latest data on unemployment filings tomorrow (the announcement is delayed until May 8), figures that will provide a staggering picture of COVID-19’s devastating effects on workers and our economy. Though not unexpected, these findings must shape the strategy, size, and scope for America’s economic recovery.