The Blog of the Roosevelt Institute

This week, Roosevelt Communications Manager Ariela Weinberger is reading an Axios article on how automation will negatively impact the racial wealth gap—especially for Black workers—and a New York Times op-ed from economists Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman on the future of tax justice and how absurd it is that “the working class is now paying

Did Marketplace Coverage Really Offer Financial Protection? Financial Gains from the Affordable Care Act’s Private Insurance Policies for the Previously Uninsured While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) expanded health coverage to millions of Americans, more than half of the people eligible for the law’s private insurance marketplace remained uninsured. Today, most of those who were

Late last month, the Business Roundtable (BRT)—a collection of 181 of the country’s largest corporations—announced that it was breaking from over 20 years of precedent. Instead of prioritizing shareholder value over everything else, the BRT declared that it would elevate the interests of all other stakeholders—including customers, communities, and suppliers—alongside it. Most notably, the very

Imagine a world in which the most pressing issue is to slash taxes for the rich and only the rich, costing the US government hundreds of billions of dollars and doing little to spur economic growth. Imagine a policy so unequal that even Mitt Romney has his doubts. Reader, I give you the capital gains

On Thursday, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released new estimates of the US “tax gap,” which measures the difference between the taxes people, corporations, and other entities legally owe and what is actually collected. The tax gap totals nearly $8 trillion over the past decade, according to the chief mathematician (#MathIsReal) for the Senate Budget

With every week in America comes another wild news cycle of near ludicrous proportions. Our political reality seems ever more preposterous as demonstrated by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross’s threat to fire employees of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for being right when Trump was wrong. Then, there was the abrupt cancellation of peace negotiations

Progressing Ahead in 2019

Summers are never slow at Roosevelt, and now we’re gearing up for an even busier fall. At the top of our to-do list is explaining how and why the public sector must make big investments to tackle our nation’s toughest challenges; promoting our ideas to influence the Democratic presidential debate; and welcoming two new fellows

America’s $1.6 trillion student debt crisis is crushing millions of us, but it is disproportionately harming Black people—and fueling the racial wealth gap.  In a new Roosevelt report, co-released with Demos and The Century Foundation, Roosevelt Program Manager Suzanne Kahn and her coauthors underscore that our debt-financed higher education system reinforces the structural racism that plagues

Behind the Numbers: Powell Backs Down

The Fed was in the news this past week, partly for its annual Jackson Hole conference, partly for some impolitic comments by a former official, but mainly for its recent decision to not lower interest rates. Most observers had expected that the cut in rates this spring would be followed by another cut this time.

In a report released earlier this week, Roosevelt Fellow Todd Tucker explains what industrial policy is and how we can do it better. Notably, he argues that—despite the common but mistaken assumption that the US does not use industrial policy—ad hoc and exclusionary industrial policies have hindered the kind of robust industrial planning necessary to