The Blog of the Roosevelt Institute

In response to the growing coronavirus crisis, states are stopping “nonessential” surgeries to ease the burden on hospitals and medical workers. While this is admirable in theory, conservatives at both the state and federal levels have capitalized on these legitimate efforts to protect our collective well-being by misclassifying critical care as “nonessential” and restricting the

Something unprecedented has happened in recent weeks. The passage of the CARES Act—the largest stimulus package in American history—and broader debates about government spending, production, and health care have fundamentally shifted the political paradigm. As the coronavirus pandemic ravages an already fragile economy, consensus is building, even among the deficit scolds of 2008–2009, around the

The coronavirus crisis is, first and foremost, a health crisis. The Trump administration’s failure to take the threat of COVID-19 seriously—and our systematic, decades-long decimation of our nation’s public health infrastructure—has turned what may have been a public health challenge into a crisis for our health care system. And one area where the failures of

With the CARES Act corporate bailout underway, large corporations are once again being rescued by a hurting American public. No one doubts that stabilizing the economy and saving jobs as a first priority is absolutely critical. What’s also necessary is to understand what factors—besides the coronavirus—made large corporations so vulnerable in this moment.  One factor

A Village Named Roosevelt

As a second-year law student at the University of Georgia School of Law, I spend most of my time poring through case law, analyzing hypotheticals, and developing my ability to advocate for marginalized and low-income clients. The foundation of these pursuits, however, was developed long ago.  I started college at the University of Georgia in

In the last three weeks, it has become clear that millennials are going to experience a second major recession in their working lives before they turn 40. Even before the COVID-19 crisis, it was widely documented that this generation—ages 24 to 39 and the most racially diverse adult cohort in history—was experiencing long-term harms from

Janelle Jones, the managing director of policy and research at Groundwork Collaborative, has coined what she calls a personal motto and economic ideology: “Black women best.” She means that if Black women—who, since our nation’s founding, have been the most disadvantaged by the rules that structure our society—can one day thrive in the economy, then

The Roosevelt Institute recently launched the Climate and Economic Transformation program, which will research and promote government’s affirmative role as a public provider and the rules and institutions necessary for healthy, equitable governance. The program will focus on using these tools of economic transformation to address many problems in the US and beyond, including the

The current economic crisis is fast-moving, and many of the challenges we are facing—and anticipating—are unprecedented. Though the immediate effects of the coronavirus may spark a potential recession, our economy’s underlying structural problems mean that the fallout will likely be much worse and last longer for millions of people unless we act quickly and aggressively. 

As millions face unemployment and dire financial prospects amid the coronavirus pandemic, hotels, airlines, and other large corporations are repeating the script of 2008: asking for massive public bailouts after years of extractive shareholder payments. Before the government buoys these companies with the public’s money, we must ensure that they are resilient in the future