To address the existential threat of climate change, the international community must come together and rewrite the rules. In a new working paper, Roosevelt Fellow Todd Tucker argues that a global Green New Deal—in tandem with a domestic Green New Deal—can both remake an international trade infrastructure in crisis and decarbonize the global economy in

After a few decades’ absence, industrial policy is back in the national conversation, with support from leading academics, grassroots movements, and politicians ranging from Sen. Elizabeth Warren to Sen. Marco Rubio. Despite its dormancy in the public debate, industrial policy and planning lie at the heart of many capitalist economies—and both should anchor the future

On July 9 and 10, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testified before Congress regarding the Fed’s conduct of monetary policy. Both his prepared testimony and his responses to legislators’ pointed questioning marked a dramatic departure from the consensus that has long guided macroeconomic policy in the United States. When historians write the story of American

The Roosevelt Network’s Emerging Fellowship program is a yearlong opportunity for college students to dig deeper into formal policy research and advocacy efforts. This year, the University of Georgia’s Tarun Ramesh and Northeastern University’s Karl Meakin tackled some of the most pressing issues of our time: the opioid crisis and climate change.  In “Incorporation of

For too long, the building blocks of a good life, including solid benefits, strong wages, and safe working conditions, have been left to the whim of markets and employers rather than guaranteed for all. In today’s economy, curbing corporate and employer power and reclaiming public power are essential steps toward addressing the collective changes that

Structural problems in the health care and hospital industries are specifically hurting women in rural America, both as patients and as workers. In a new Roosevelt issue brief, Andrea Flynn, Rakeen Mabud, and Emma Chessen explore some of the industry-wide shifts that have occurred in rural areas over the last several decades. They then describe the

In a new working paper, Roosevelt Fellow Brishen Rogers makes the case that automation is not a major threat to workers today, and that it will not likely be a major threat in the near future. However, he contends that existing labor laws allow companies to use new technology—specifically information technology—in ways that give them outsized

The mainstream economic theory that guides corporations in the US only works if markets are perfectly efficient. This flawed theory has led to corporate decision-making that centers shareholders above all else, including other stakeholders (e.g., workers), long-term business growth, and economic health. This shareholder-first ideology is referred to as “shareholder primacy,” which does not reflect

In partnership with the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, the Roosevelt Institute evaluated two decades of the Ford Foundation’s grant-making that centers the racial wealth gap (RWG) and provided recommendations for how the philanthropic sector can more effectively address the issue. Roosevelt Fellows Andrea Flynn and Rakeen Mabud find that Ford’s work

In a working paper, Roosevelt Senior Economist and Policy Counsel Lenore Palladino investigates whether stock buybacks occur more frequently, independent of other factors, when corporate insiders are selling their own personal shareholdings. In her empirical analysis of the relationship between insider sales and stock buybacks, Palladino finds that a 10 percent increase in insider sales