Jump To
Forge FellowshipEmerging FellowshipRoosevelt in Washington Fellowship

The Roosevelt Network trains and supports undergraduate college students through three fellowship programs:

Forge Fellowship

The Forge Fellowship serves as the entry point for students to the Network and a way to honor the legacy of the late Reese Needer—a Network staff member, organizer, mentor, and friend to many Roosevelters. The Forge Fellowship curriculum develops leadership skills, demystifies policy creation, and empowers students to investigate a local policy problem aligned with our issue areas; all while bringing neoliberalism and its alternatives centrally into fellows’ learning. Forge Fellows are paired with a mentor from the Roosevelt alumni community, and they receive our professional development curriculum to level up their networking, interviewing, resume-writing, and cover letter skills.

Emerging Fellowship

The Emerging Fellowship is an eight-month, policy writing-focused fellowship experience designed for Network students in the last one to two years of their undergraduate degree program. This rigorous and advanced Fellowship offers progressive-minded students the opportunity to dive deeper into policy research and writing, receive mentorship from Network Alumni and Roosevelt Institute staff, be in community with other passionate policy wonks, and ground themselves in Roosevelt’s vision for a just economy and multiracial democracy. Fellowship alumni become members of our national Network, with continued opportunities for mentorship and programming for young professionals.

Emerging Fellows will be trained across key skill areas necessary for them to understand the progressive policy landscape, will engage with local advocates and policy experts, and will produce a short policy brief at the end of the fellowship experience. Students in the program will also have opportunities to explore various graduate school pathways through Network alumni panels and mentor connections. All Emerging Fellows will receive a $3,000 stipend, disbursed in three installments, over the course of their program experience.

Students applying should be aware that the time commitment necessary to be successful in this program is similar to that of a senior seminar or independent study course. With the support of Network staff, students will be expected to engage in orientation trainings and cohort discussions, design their own research plan and timeline, develop the framework of their policy argument, and produce a final comprehensive document discussing a policy recommendation.

All applicants should be passionate about exploring policy solutions in the following issue areas:

  • Corporate power (e.g., antitrust, anti-monopoly, or combatting corporate concentration);
  • Worker power (e.g., worker justice, labor protections, or higher education);
  • Climate justice (e.g., environment protections, green jobs, or environmental racism); or
  • Race & democracy (e.g., institutional racism, voter protections/access, or closing the racial wealth gap).

At this time, Roosevelt Network programs do not support students interested in health-care policy, international development, or K-12 education.

 

What will the experience look like?

During the first three to four months of the program, Emerging Fellows can expect to be engaged for 10 hours a week in a combination of (completely virtual) trainings, biweekly one-on-one supervisory meetings, monthly cohort and mentor calls, reading and homework assignments, and community events. Students must have the capacity to dedicate two hours during the week and two to three hours every other Saturday to real-time, virtual training sessions—this program does not offer self-paced, virtual trainings. Examples of trainings during the first half of the program include:

  • Understanding Neoliberalism
  • Advanced Policy Research & Writing
  • Career Exploration Panel
  • Building Emotional Intelligence
  • Community-Centered Policy Approaches

The last four months of the program ramps up to ~20 hours a week dedicated to individual policy idea research and writing, continued one-on-one supervisory calls, community events, and a rigorous policy memo review process by Roosevelt Institute staff and Network alumni. Students must commit to being available (virtually) every Thursday afternoon (1-5 pm EST) for the last eight weeks of the program. Finally, Emerging Fellows will attend the Network’s three-day conference, Hyde Park, in early August 2023 to present their policy memo to the Network community and Roosevelt Institute staff. All travel and lodging costs associated with this opportunity will be covered by the Roosevelt Network.

When does the program run?

The Emerging Fellowship will recruit and train two cohorts over the course of the next 18 months. The first Emerging Fellows cohort will run on an expedited schedule from March to August 2023. The second cohort will run on the traditional academic-year schedule, from August 2023 to May 2024. We encourage you to apply to whichever cohort experience works best for you!

You should apply if you:
  • Are a full time undergraduate student in the last one to two years of your degree program;
  • Are a student attending an American college or university. Network programs cannot accept students attending non-American institutions;
  • Have at least one more semester left in your undergraduate degree program for the 2022-2023 academic year;
  • Are an undergraduate student who has already engaged with policy research through your undergraduate program or experience in an existing Network chapter;
  • Can commit to a part-time opportunity that spans March through August 2023 and that will require some weekend engagements;
  • Are passionate about exploring progressive policy in the areas of corporate power, worker power, race & democracy, or climate justice; and
  • Have the capacity to dedicate two hours during the week and two to three hours every other Saturday to real-time, virtual training sessions.
How do you apply?

In an effort to offer more flexibility to students making Summer 2023 plans, the Network will offer two waves of applications for the Emerging Fellowship. Interested applicants can choose to apply in Wave 1 or Wave 2. Neither group of applicants will receive preferential consideration in the application process.

WAVE 1
Application opens: November 1, 2022
Application deadline: December 20, 2022

WAVE 2:
Application opens: January 9, 2023
Application deadline: February 6, 2023

If you are interested in learning more about the Emerging Fellowship program, please join us for an upcoming information session on Wednesday, September 28th at either 12 or 6 pm EST!

Register for September 28th at 12 pm EST
Register for September 28th at 6 pm EST

Roosevelt in Washington Fellowship

In an effort to create career exploration opportunities for progressive-minded undergraduate students and to build a more robust pipeline into the progressive policy ecosystem, the Roosevelt Network is launching the Roosevelt in Washington (RIW) Fellowship. As a leader in the political and economic ideological public square, the Roosevelt Institute is uniquely equipped to train the next generation of progressive policy leaders who will contribute to a vision for a just economy and multiracial democracy.

Roosevelt in Washington is a six-month leadership and professional development program for Network students, engaging them during the spring and summer before their junior or senior year. This program supports progressive policy career exploration, targeted skill-building training, mentorship from Network alumni, and placement into an eight- to nine-week summer internship within the Roosevelt Institute or a partner organization. Partner organization internship opportunities will be announced when the application opens in November 2022. RIW Fellows will also have the opportunity to grow as leaders in a community of other passionate policy wonks, with weekly seminar sessions on critical skills like emotional intelligence, coalition building, and project management.

RIW delivers the structured scaffolding for students to have a transformational summer experience, filled with values exploration, real-world skill building, dedicated mentorship, and a deep sense of community. In addition to a fundamental understanding of the various policy-aligned careers that exist in the progressive ecosystem, students will leave this experience with the confidence and skills to chart their unique professional pathway in the movement. The RIW Fellowship aims to serve as a stepping stone for a long career that strengthens the progressive movement.

What will this experience look like?

Four-Month Intensive
RIW Fellows will be selected by February 2023 and will then embark on a completely virtual four-month intensive to prepare them for a summer internship within a Roosevelt Institute department or aligned partner organization. Students must be able to dedicate two hours during the week and two to three hours every other Saturday to real-time, virtual training sessions. During these four months, students will engage in:

  • Professional development skills training, such as resume writing and networking;
  • Policy research and writing training;
  • Building a relationship with their Network alumni-matched mentor;
  • Biweekly meetings with a Network staff supervisor;
  • Coursework in the ideological tenets of Roosevelt Institute’s worldview;
  • Leadership, professional writing, and project management trainings; and
  • Learning how to connect FDR’s legacy to the current context of American domestic policy.

Two-Month Internship
Roosevelt Network students will then apply their learning to a two-month internship experience, during which they will be supported by a trio of professionals invested in their growth; this trio includes a Network staff supervisor, their internship site supervisor, and a Network alumni mentor. Fellows will work 30 hours per week at their internship site, attend 5 hours of supplemental learning experiences at the end of every week, and dedicate 5 hours a week to a team project. Supplemental learning experiences will include a combination of:

  • Site visits to progressive policy organizations or government agencies;
  • Career exploration panels;
  • Networking events with Roosevelt Alumni in Washington, DC;
  • Community building-focused social outings;
  • Alumni mentor meetings/activities;
  • Seminar-style discussions on policy challenges across four of the Roosevelt Institute issue areas—Corporate Power, Worker Power, Climate Justice, and Race & Democracy.
You should apply if you:
  • Are a full time undergraduate student in the last one to two years of your degree program;
  • Are a student attending an American college or university. Network programs cannot accept students attending non-American institutions;
  • Have at least one more semester left in your undergraduate degree program for the 2023-2024 academic year;
  • Can commit to a part-time opportunity from March through May 2023, and then full-time in June and July 2023;
  • Have the capacity to dedicate two hours during the week and two to three hours every other Saturday to real-time, virtual training sessions from March to May 2023;
  • Can commit to living in Washington, DC for an internship placement in June and July 2023;
  • Are an undergraduate student who has already engaged with policy discussions through your undergraduate major or experience in an existing Network chapter;
  • Are passionate about exploring progressive policy in the areas of corporate power, worker power, race & democracy, or climate justice.
How do you apply?

In an effort to offer more flexibility to students making Summer 2023 plans, the Network will offer two waves of applications for the Roosevelt in Washington Fellowship. Interested applicants can choose to apply in Wave 1 or Wave 2. Neither group of applicants will receive preferential consideration in the application process.

WAVE 1
Application opens: November 1, 2022
Application deadline: December 20, 2022

WAVE 2:
Application opens: January 9, 2023
Application deadline: February 6, 2023

If you are interested in learning more about the Roosevelt in Washington Fellowship program, please join us for an upcoming information session on Wednesday, September 28 at 12 or 6 pm EST!

Register for September 28th at 12 pm EST
Register for September 28th at 6 pm EST

2022-2023 Forge Fellows

Lilly Amechi, Forge Fellow

Anton Mendelsohn, Forge Fellow

Angelica Morales, Forge Fellow

Natalie Solomon, Forge Fellow

Shruti Singh, Forge Fellow

Alicia ValletteForge Fellow

2021-2022 Emerging Fellows

Madison Black, 2021-2022 Emerging Fellow

Mayukh Datta, 2021-2022 Emerging Fellow

Safiyah Zaidi, 2021-2022 Emerging Fellow

Check out the work of our 2021-2022 Emerging Fellows


Strong Unions, Strong Workers: Increasing Worker Power in Iowa's Meatpacking Industry
The Price on Our Tap: Addressing Water and Wastewater Affordability in Mississippi
Access to Doulas: A Bridge to Equitable Maternal Care in Texas

Check out the work of our past Fellows


Tackling the SNAP Gap in Georgia: Addressing Food Insecurity and Barriers to Participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
Expanding Accessibility and Affordability of Dental Care for People with Disabilities in Texas
Illinois Direct Care Training Partnership: Framework for Employer and Employee Co-Learning Fund
Implementation of Risk Assessment Tools in the Criminal Justice System: What Is a Fair Approach?
Introduction of an Organ Donation Tax Credit to Increase Access to Living-Donor Kidney Transplants in Georgia
Incorporation of Extended-Release Injectable Naltrexone into Athens-Clarke County’s Correctional Facility Health-Care Provisions
Achieving Campus Sustainability at Northeastern University Through Carbon Pricing
The Many Hands Food Cooperative: Ending Food Deserts and Building Sustainable Communities through Asset-Ownership and Community Empowerment
Remembering Rural: Shaping Connected and Automated Vehicle Technology in North Carolina
Raising Refugee Voices: Promoting Participatory Refugee Resettlement Evaluation in Maryland
Increasing the Postsecondary Expectations of Rural High School Graduates Through Alumni College and Career Networks: A Rural-Specific Education Policy
Updated and Upgraded: Improving energy efficiency in Athens-Clarke County
An Environmental, Economic and Health Imperative: Increasing Access to Solar in Virginia
Refugees’ Right to Work in Host Countries: The Economic Impact
Catalyzing an Anchored Economy in DC
Reducing Youth Tobacco Use: Restricting the Sale of Flavored Tobacco Products
Revising Ratios: Providing Government Accountability for Public University Counseling Services in Virginia
Integrating Pretrial Diversion Programs in Justice Reinvestment Strategies in Massachusetts

Past Summer Fellows

Learn more about our previous summer fellows and their work.


Manushri Desai (University of Southern California)
Researching and building a database of organizations and state policies that promote hiring of people with disabilities.
Maeve Flaherty (Columbia University)
Advocating for the increased availability of safe and clean public restrooms for all in New York City—a continuation of her proposal published in 10 Ideas 2019.
Destiny Delacruz (Guttman Community College)
Researching the availability of public recycling bins in Harlem.
Wali Ullah (The City College of New York)
Researching the adjunct crisis and financialization at the CUNY system.
Jay Hearn (University of Tennessee at Knoxville)
Expanding democratic access in Tennessee by advocating for student IDs to be accepted as a valid form of voter ID.
Alex Rivera and Isaac Keller (Western Kentucky University)
Combating gender and sexuality-based housing discrimination in Bowling Green, Kentucky, by advocating for the Fairness Ordinance.
Kevin Cao and Austin Shirley (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Researching the issue of student-driven gentrification in Chicago.
Sacha Heymann (University of Michigan)
Advocating to make the University of Michigan more affordable by researching questionable and costly investments taken on by the university and methods for better support of students.
Ashley Yan (George Washington University)
Working to increase collaboration between the New York City mayor’s office and the Asian American community to eliminate the SHSAT and desegregate NYC’s public high schools.
Jacob Henkels (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Working to reduce recidivism and create stronger communities by establishing an affordable housing cooperative for reentering citizens in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
Susan Ismail (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Fighting for greater equity in higher education by improving access to MAP grants in Illinois—an extension of her work started in the Spring Incubator.
Aditya Krishnaswamy (University of Georgia)
Working to increase health insurance coverage across Georgia by creating mandatory elements of health insurance literacy to high school health education curricula.
Simran Modi (University of Georgia)
Combating employment discrimination against unhoused individuals by advocating for businesses in Athens, GA to remove questions about permanent housing on job applications.
Olivia Brady and Nina Medernach (New York University)
Promoting greater education equity in New York City by advocating for reduced-fare MetroCards for all CUNY students.
Cara Schiavone (George Washington University)
Advocating to change George Washington University’shealth insurance system to make health care accessible for all students.