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Over the last five decades, an empirical revolution in economics has undermined many of the assumptions of “neoliberalism,” the reigning approach to economic policy. Many of the guiding assumptions underlying neoliberal policymaking no longer speak to what is going on in the economy or our country more broadly. In “The Empirical Failures of Neoliberalism,” Roosevelt

Measured conventionally, very little about today’s politics makes sense. Many attempts to explain the chaos point to political partisanship or regional animosity, but we believe that the chaos is a sign of something deeper: the death of one worldview and the ascent of another. The neoliberal ideal—that markets would create both economic and political freedom

Against the backdrop of a $1.6 trillion student debt crisis and declining college enrollment, free college has emerged as a political lightning rod in today’s higher education debate. Questions about who should and will benefit⁠—and what “free” even means⁠—have created a free-for-whom free-for-all, with proposals varying both by student and institutional access. To evaluate these

College affordability has been a major kitchen-table issue for American families for the past three decades. This is not surprising considering that college tuition rates have shot up since the 1980s: Tuition at public four-year colleges increased 213 percent from 1987 to 2017 and 129 percent at private not-for-profit colleges, helping drive the $1.6 trillion

The idea of “free college” has assumed an important place in the world of big and bold new policy ideas. However, it’s become an umbrella phrase for a variety of different policy proposals with very different terms and conditions. A free college plan can reinforce progressive values—reducing racial disparities, supporting democracy, and building a more

As policymakers consider free or debt-free college plans, it is critical that they recognize that today higher education is essential and that the federal government can play a vital role in ensuring that quality higher education is broadly accessible. Many current free or debt-free college proposals share a similar structure of creating federal-state partnerships, but

For decades, literature on the international dimension of tax injustice has focused on the conflict between tax havens and developed welfare states. The Panamas and Cayman Islands of the world helped rich individuals and corporations shield their assets from tax collectors, largely unchallenged before the financial crisis because states were unable or unwilling to build

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In response to “The Starving State: Why Capitalism’s Salvation Depends on Taxation” by Joseph E. Stiglitz, Gabriel Zucman, and Todd Tucker for Foreign Affairs, the Roosevelt Institute is hosting a blog symposium to further examine the history of international tax rules and the path ahead toward more inclusive and fair international tax policies. Opening the

The negotiations on corporate taxation at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) BEPS Inclusive Framework initiative have rightly generated much discussion, both on the process and on the proposed changes in tax policies. Allison Christians has pointed to several concerns that developing countries have with both: the proposal is one that has maximum

The global fight over how—and where—to tax the new digital economy is raging on. Just last week, the Office of the US Trade Representative (USTR) published the conclusions from its investigation into France’s new tax on large tech companies, such as Apple, Facebook, and Google. The USTR found that the French tax discriminates against US