On the surface, COP21, the international climate change conference that started this week in Paris, appears to have all the right ingredients for building a global and equitable strategy to address climate change. The emerging messages deal directly with environmental justice—ending world poverty through the shift to a low-emission, sustainable future. Achieving such lofty goals will require a transformation of the global economy. Yet the proposed agreement fails to address some of the underlying factors leading to climate change and environmental injustice, such as economic inequality and the distribution of environmental burdens.

Table of Contents 1. What are “the rules”? 2. Will fighting inequality hurt growth? 3. Isn’t government part of the problem? Won’t more government intervention stifle business growth and the free market? 4. Why tax the rich more? Why should we punish people for having success? 5. What does inequality matter if everyone has the

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The University of Michigan and Michigan State University, the two largest universities in the state, together purchase more than $2 billion of goods and services each year, including everything from desks to high-powered computers. Much of this money is spent in Michigan, supporting local businesses even through tough economic times. Unfortunately, state policies have prevented U of M and MSU from fully using their purchasing power for the benefit of all of Michigan’s business owners.

Emerging Fellow for Equal Justice Andrew Lindsay writes in the New York Times on Amherst Uprising and the fight for racial justice on his campus: For many students of color, at Amherst College and elsewhere, it is not uncommon to feel a continuous sense of homelessness. “Are you sure this space is really mine?” we

As presented at a congressional briefing hosted by the House Full Employment Caucus on December 1, 2015. Congressman Conyers and members of the Full Employment Caucus, thank you for the privilege of speaking to you today on the issue of the Federal Reserve accountability to the public—a topic of perennial importance that has become even more

Writing for the Baltimore Sun, Student Board of Advisors member Andrea Sosa of Roosevelt @ Goucher argues: As key participants in the climate change debate gather in Paris, they should consider how the issues they discuss affect people of color and whether the solutions they have proposed have done enough to balance out the injustices

Next week, global leaders in industry, government, and finance will descend on Paris for the 21st Conference of Parties (COP21) hosted by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). With a significant focus on private sector innovation, more than 25,000 delegates will aim to produce the first legally binding agreement on industrial greenhouse gas emissions, as well as financial incentives for more efficient models of sustainable growth. While it remains to be seen whether international leaders can achieve the lofty goal of legally binding yet ecologically sound carbon emission standards, what is clear is that UNFCCC forgot to invite an entire generation to this discussion table.

In September, the Department of Education unveiled its new College Scorecard website. The scorecards are a major step forward in unleashing the power of educational data, as they allow prospective students to compare outcomes at different schools, providing data on costs, graduation rates, graduate indebtedness, and student earnings, among other metrics. But the scorecards have shortcomings, too, ranging from the limits of the data sample—the tax returns of students who received federal aid—to their reduction of a college education to a purely economic exchange. Among its most significant oversights, the scorecard data fails women.

Writing for The Hill, chapter head at Roosevelt @ Denver Morgan Smith argues: Structuring effective policy requires us to stop willfully ignoring the facts. This does not mean we cannot be cautious about environmental policy choices, but it does mean we have to stop believing that the 2,000+ scientists from 195 countries who work on

For decades now, Republicans have been telling people that businesses are the job creators and that regulating or taxing businesses will mean fewer jobs—which is why so many Americans believe them. Rarely has a Democrat challenged the underlying assertion that prosperity comes from businesses. But on Saturday, we saw two of the Democratic candidates for