On July 9 and 10, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testified before Congress regarding the Fed’s conduct of monetary policy. Both his prepared testimony and his responses to legislators’ pointed questioning marked a dramatic departure from the consensus that has long guided macroeconomic policy in the United States. When historians write the story of American

The Roosevelt Network’s Emerging Fellowship program is a yearlong opportunity for college students to dig deeper into formal policy research and advocacy efforts. This year, the University of Georgia’s Tarun Ramesh and Northeastern University’s Karl Meakin tackled some of the most pressing issues of our time: the opioid crisis and climate change.  In “Incorporation of

For too long, the building blocks of a good life, including solid benefits, strong wages, and safe working conditions, have been left to the whim of markets and employers rather than guaranteed for all. In today’s economy, curbing corporate and employer power and reclaiming public power are essential steps toward addressing the collective changes that

Structural problems in the health care and hospital industries are specifically hurting women in rural America, both as patients and as workers. In a new Roosevelt issue brief, Andrea Flynn, Rakeen Mabud, and Emma Chessen explore some of the industry-wide shifts that have occurred in rural areas over the last several decades. They then describe the

In a new working paper, Roosevelt Fellow Brishen Rogers makes the case that automation is not a major threat to workers today, and that it will not likely be a major threat in the near future. However, he contends that existing labor laws allow companies to use new technology—specifically information technology—in ways that give them outsized

The mainstream economic theory that guides corporations in the US only works if markets are perfectly efficient. This flawed theory has led to corporate decision-making that centers shareholders above all else, including other stakeholders (e.g., workers), long-term business growth, and economic health. This shareholder-first ideology is referred to as “shareholder primacy,” which does not reflect

In partnership with the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, the Roosevelt Institute evaluated two decades of the Ford Foundation’s grant-making that centers the racial wealth gap (RWG) and provided recommendations for how the philanthropic sector can more effectively address the issue. Roosevelt Fellows Andrea Flynn and Rakeen Mabud find that Ford’s work

In a working paper, Roosevelt Senior Economist and Policy Counsel Lenore Palladino investigates whether stock buybacks occur more frequently, independent of other factors, when corporate insiders are selling their own personal shareholdings. In her empirical analysis of the relationship between insider sales and stock buybacks, Palladino finds that a 10 percent increase in insider sales

Despite Big Pharma’s claim that high-cost medicines are the price society must pay for innovation, recent research provides ample evidence that overpriced medicines are not necessary for the industry to find cures or revolutionize. Rather, high-cost and low-quality medicines are the price patients pay for an industry that prioritizes profit-seeking over public health. Like all

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Without bold, visionary action to address race- and gender-based wealth inequities, the chasm between those who are economically secure and those who are not—mainly Black, brown, and Native American communities and women—will continue to grow. In the end, these issues threaten our nation’s ability to finally achieve our promise of freedom, dignity, and security for