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As millions face unemployment and dire financial prospects amid the coronavirus pandemic, hotels, airlines, and other large corporations are repeating the script of 2008: asking for massive public bailouts after years of extractive shareholder payments. Before the government buoys these companies with the public’s money, we must ensure that they are resilient in the future

Corporate profits and executive pay are sky high today, while wages for most American workers have remained low and stagnant over the past several decades. Today’s high-profit, low-wage economy is, in part, a result of rules and policies that shape corporate decision-making. These rules have allowed CEOs, shareholders, and executives to move more and more

In a working paper, Roosevelt Senior Economist and Policy Counsel Lenore Palladino investigates whether stock buybacks occur more frequently, independent of other factors, when corporate insiders are selling their own personal shareholdings. In her empirical analysis of the relationship between insider sales and stock buybacks, Palladino finds that a 10 percent increase in insider sales

Today, Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and Congressman Ro Khanna (D-CA) introduced the STOP Walmart Act, which prohibits large companies from engaging in stock buybacks unless they make serious investments in their workers. While the act takes aim at Walmart, the country’s largest private employer, it highlights the theme of my work: that excessive giveaways to

The 2016 corruption scandal at Wells Fargo, in which executives pressured employees to meet “wildly unrealistic sales targets,” created a work environment described as “relentless pressure.” Once revealed, the massive fraud committed against millions of consumers led to congressional hearings, substantial fines by state and federal regulators, and a series of announced changes by Wells

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 31, 2018 CONTACT: Alexander Tucciarone, atucciarone@rooseveltinstitute.org, 516-263-9775   NEW REPORT: U.S. CORPORATIONS ARE SPLURGING ON STOCK BUYBACKS WHILE WORKER WAGES STAGNATE It’s about priorities: McDonald’s could pay its 1.9 million workers $4K more per year with money it spent on buybacks   NEW YORK, NY – At a time when highly profitable

In a joint publication of the National Employment Law Project (NELP) and the Roosevelt Institute, Irene Tung and Katy Milani expose the extent of stock buyback spending across the U.S. economy from 2015 to 2017—finding that companies spent almost 60 percent of net profits on buybacks. At a time of growing economic inequality, with millions

For a full analysis of why stock buybacks artificially boost share prices and reward shareholders and executives to the real detriment of workers and our economy at large, see Stock Buybacks: Driving a High-Profit, Low-Wage Economy. Monday’s bold speech by Robert Jackson Jr., Commissioner at the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), will hopefully mark the

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 22, 2018 CONTACT: Alexander Tucciarone, atucciarone@rooseveltinstitute.org, 516-263-9775   NEW ROOSEVELT INSTITUTE REPORT: LIMITS ON STOCK BUYBACKS AT WALMART COULD MEAN HUGE RAISES FOR WORKING FAMILIES Research From Leading Progressive Think Tank Highlights Need to Crack Down on Stock Buybacks   NEW YORK, NY — If Walmart were to redirect $10 billion that it

MEDIA ADVISORY: March 22, 2018 CONTACT: Alexander Tucciarone, atucciarone@rooseveltinstitute.org, 516-263-9775   STATEMENT: Financial Economy Experts at Roosevelt Institute React to Bill Introduced by Senator Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) to Ban Stock Buybacks New York, NY — Responding to the introduction of the Reward Work Act by Senator Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), which would ban stock buybacks and