At the Roosevelt Institute, we understand the importance and value of young people’s ideas, and we’re actively working with a new generation of leaders committed to fighting for their vision. Our oldest and most competitive policy journal, 10 Ideas, promotes that work by elevating the top student-generated policy proposals from across the country. Healthcare Rehabilitating Sports

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10 Ideas 2018

Roosevelters all across the country are rising to the challenges of today and building their own rulebook, so that government can be reflective of and responsive to the people it’s meant to serve. Our current political and social reality is profoundly different than ones that existed in previous iterations of this journal, but despite that,

The dramatic rise in stock buybacks following the passage of the GOP tax plan, also known as the Tax Cut and Jobs Act, has elevated the role stock buybacks play in on our economy. Estimates have shown more than $100 billion in new stock buyback programs have been authorized since the tax law’s passage. Additionally,

The George Washington University (GW) has a student health insurance problem. Annual insurance premiums for the university-sponsored student health insurance plan (SHIP) reached a five-year high of $4,103 for the 2017-18 policy year. This cost is exorbitantly high in comparison to similar plans offered by many other universities, discouraging students from enrolling in the school’s

Inequality and Economic Growth

In the middle of the 20th century, it came to be believed that “a rising tide lifts all boats”: economic growth would bring increasing wealth and higher living standards to all sections of society. At the time, there was some evidence behind that claim. In the ensuing economic and political debate, this “rising-tide hypothesis” evolved

The ability of workers to bargain for a greater share of a firm’s corporate profits has eroded over decades, and one of the growing drivers of this reality is the financialization of the corporate sector. Corporate financialization can be summed up as two behaviors: firms (like Walmart or Pfizer) increasingly earning profits from financial activity

There is much to be concerned about in America today: a growing political and economic divide, slowing growth, decreasing life expectancy, an epidemic of diseases of despair. The unhappiness that is apparent has taken an ugly turn, with an increase in protectionism and nativism. Trump’s diagnosis, which blames outsiders, is wrong, as are the prescriptions

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President Trump ran on a platform of “Make America Great Again.” A familiar retort was that America was still great. But it was not as great as it could be. Its greatness arises not so much from its military power, but from its soft power and its economic power. In today’s world, America’s continued racism

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The Overselling of Globalization

Globalization was oversold. Politicians and some economists wrongly argued for trade agreements on the basis of job creation. The gains to GDP or growth were overestimated, and the costs, including adverse distributional effects, were underestimated. There have been important political consequences of this overselling, including the undermining of confidence in the elites that advocated globalization.

Despite record corporate profits and high stock prices, most Americans have not shared in the post-recession recovery. In a new Roosevelt Institute report, Fellows Mike Konczal and J.W. Mason discuss how the Great Recession changed the way the Federal Reserve (the Fed) uses macroeconomic monetary policy—a set of rules influencing the supply of credit and